History (HIST)

HIST 305
Latin America: 1810-Present

The history of Latin America from colonial times emphasizing the political evolution of the several republics. Special consideration will be given to the political, economic, military, and social relations of the U.S. with Latin American countries in the 20th century.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 306
Women in Latin American History

This course will students understand how ideas about gender have shaped the lives of women and men in Latin America and how women and men have, in turn, influenced ideas about gender. The course will improve students ability to understand and analyze historical documents, processes, and writings, and will improve students' verbal and written skills though public speaking and writing.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 307
Latin American History Through Film

An overview of the historical development of Latin American film, from early to contemporary films, along with a study of the methods of critical inquiry developed to analyze film and cultural and political history in Latin America. This course provides differing visions of Latin American history as constructed through film. We analyze some of the major films of Latin American cinema with a view to the characteristic marks of this cinema, its aesthetic, major themes, the various ways that it impacts political, social and cultural systems and how social-political changes in turn impact the production and politics of film. Films will be in Spanish and English subtitles.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 311
Twentieth Century Europe: 1890-1945

Nationalism and nation states; patterns of diplomacy; origins, conduct, and settlement of World War I; Russian Revolution; fate of democracy; rise of totalitarianism; World War II and the Holocaust.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 321
World Religions I: Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism

The history of the "Big 3" of the world's religions -- Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism -- is traced from antiquity to the present day. Key individuals, texts, theological innovations, and reformations will be discussed and analyzed. This is predominantly a lecture-style course, although there will be occasional class discussions on primary or secondary religious texts. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed HIST 380 World Religions I.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 322
World Religions II: Judaism, Buddhism, and Nature Religions

The history of Judaism, Buddhism, and a number of faiths with a similar worldview that have been placed under the heading of Nature Religions is traced from antiquity to the present day. Key individuals, texts, theological innovations, and reformations will be discussed and analyzed. This is predominantly a lecture-style course, although there will be occasional class discussions on primary or secondary religious texts. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed HIST 380 World Religions II.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 332
United States Women's History

An examination of how women shaped the course of US history and of how key political and social events shaped their lives. Since no single experience conveys the history of all American women, this course will discuss the diverse realities of women of different races, classes, ethnicities, and political tendencies. It looks at how and why the conditions, representations, and identities of women changed or remained the same. By incorporating women into our vision of history, we develop a more complete understanding of our past.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 333
Ethnicity in American History and Life

Examines the creation of the American nationality from its diverse roots, which include almost all the world's great cultures. Special stress on immigration, African American history, and the relationships among concepts of race, class, and gender.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Humanities (H)
HIST 336
The Industrialization of America: 1789-1898

Traces America's transformation from agrarian republic to Industrial Empire. Stresses impact of industrialization on all aspects of life, the nature of slavery, the failures of "Reconstruction", and the western and urban frontiers. Explores the adventures that made America a great power.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 337
The American Century: 1898-1975

Traces how America attained economic and military power and what it did with that power at home and abroad. Discusses the World Wars, the Great Depression, the limits of the "welfare state," the movement for Black equality, and the transformations of the 1960's.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 338
Contemporary America: 1960 and After

Explores the historical roots of contemporary issues. Topics vary by semester but always include the Cold War and America's international position, tensions over immigration and racial integration, and the historic roots of changes in popular culture and daily life.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 340
Rise of Global Economy

A historical analysis of contemporary globalization in trade, technology, labor, and culture. The course includes a comparative analysis of the world's leading economies (e.g. Great Britain, Germany, United States, and Japan), and considers their varied responses to industrial revolutions in the past two centuries.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 344
History of the Ancient Mediterranean

Students gain an understanding of the history and culture of Greece, Rome, and ancient Palestine. Walk a mile in someone else's sandals while tracing the early foundations of Western culture. Using disciplined analysis and creative interpretation to reconstruct aspects of ancient civilizations, students are challenged to escape their own personal and cultural perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 345
Women and the World: 20th Century

This course examines how women in different regions of the world have helped to shape their nation's society and history. It also explores the connections and/or lack of connections between women, women's movements, and key political events during the twentieth century. The course will both draw some general themes and look at some specific case studies.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 350
US Urban History

Basic facts and issues of U.S. urban history; reasons for the growth, development, and decay of cities; origins of contemporary urban political, social, and economic problems.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 351
The City in World History

This course explores the city throughout world history as both place and space. The course begins by examining the early history of cities in the ancient world around the globe and then moves across time to examine the medieval, early modern, and modern/contemporary city. By the end of the course students will be expected to understand how and why cities have been constructed and how cities and the idea of the city have, over time, been historically interconnected even before the global urban world of today.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 352
History of Chicago

Basic institutions of the contemporary city studied in their historical context, using Chicago as a case study. Political machines, social and political reform traditions, planning agencies, ethnic neighborhoods, organized crime and many other urban institutions.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 355
Digital Labor

What is digital labor? Since the mid-twentieth century, labor forces have radically changed in relation to new digital, electronic computing technologies. Perhaps the clearest example of this change is the evolution of computer programming as a respected and highly paid profession. But those who work directly with computers are not the only ones affected. As computing systems have steadily reorganized aspects of society, the idea of what counts as labor has changed. This course introduces students to historical and contemporary issues in the history of technology to explain how our national and global work forces are shaped by digital, electronic technology. We will look at everything from World War II electronic codebreaking to present-day struggles over net neutrality. We will also look at the "hidden labor" behind our digital technologies, from hardware's origins in African mines and Chinese factories to the strenuous manual and psychological labor hidden in the back-ends of many of our favorite online services. Throughout, students will learn how seemingly unrelated changes share a common history. The course will include several guest lecturers from academia and industry. Students will be asked to write papers, do multimedia projects, and engage with their classmates in group projects.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 372
History of Engineering

Examines the birth and evolution of professional engineering. Topics include engineering education, professional standards, industrial and government contexts, distinctive modes of thinking, and engineering in popular culture.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 373
History of Video Games

This course introduces students to the history of video gaming while providing instruction in scholarly practice with an emphasis on research and writing. Topics include the technical and cultural history of the video games, academic writing, and humanities research methods.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 374
Disasters!

This course investigates different disasters throughout history to show how disasters catalyze legislative and technological change. Since our understanding of what constitutes a disaster is constructed through public discourse and popular media, this course will employ a variety of media and teaching techniques. In addition to discussion, lecture, and required readings, students will watch documentaries and read news articles to piece together the histories of regulatory changes effected by disasters in the realms of power production, environmental stewardship, manufacturing, transportation, infrastructure, public health, reproduction, food production, and more.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Ethics (E), Humanities (H)
HIST 375
History of Computing

This course addresses the question "How do technologies change the world?" through examining the history of computing. Readings and discussions on the people, technologies, ideas, and institutions of modern computing; and the uses of computers in computation, control, simulation, communication, and recreation. We'll learn about hardware heavyweights, software moguls, and where the World Wide Web came from.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 377
Filming the Past

How does history become known, and how do certain accounts become popularized as the truth or "common knowledge"? What role do visual media, particularly films and documentaries, play in the process of creating and understanding our shared past? Can film be a force for uncovering and popularizing "hidden" histories that upset our assumptions about the past? This course takes a novel approach to less well-known chapters in history by looking at how films and documentaries can be tools for disseminating historical knowledge and how they can also be activist interventions in how we understand the past and its relationship to the society we live in today. Throughout the course, we will watch films and documentaries that try to answer the questions posed above, and we will read historical accounts of the events they convey. Students will learn how to write a short history from primary documents and then transfer it to an audio or a visual medium. This will result in 2 projects: a short podcast and a short documentary film on a historical topic.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 380
Topics in History

An investigation into a topic of current or enduring interest in history, which will be announced by the instructor when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 382
Technology in History: 1500-1850

Explores the process of technological change during the birth of industrial societies. Considers the context of early industrial development in Europe, then examines the industrial revolution in Britain and America. Concludes by assessing technology's role in European domination of Asia and Africa.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 383
Technology in History: 1850 to Present

Examines technological change as a characteristic activity of modern societies. Investigates the science-based "second" Industrial Revolution in Europe and America. Explores the varied responses of artists, writers, architects, and philosophers to the machine age. Concludes by discussing technology's place in the modern nation-state.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
HIST 491
Independent Reading and Research

Consent of department. For advanced students.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Credit: Variable
Satisfies: Humanities (H)
HIST 580
Topics in History

A course for graduate students on a topic in history.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
HIST 597
Special Problems: History

Advanced topics in the study of history , in which there is special student and faculty interest. Variable Credit: 1-6.

Credit: Variable
HIST 691
Research and Thesis PhD

This course is for PhD students whose dissertation requires working with a historian.

Credit: Variable