Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 301
Ancient Philosophy

A study of major works by Plato, Aristotle, and other important ancient philosophers.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 302
Origins of Modern Philosophy

The study of major 17th and 18th century philosophers, such as Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 305
Twentieth Century Philosophy

A study of recent philosophical trends (or movements), including logical positivism, existentialism, ordinary language philosophy, etc.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 311
Great Philosophers

An in-depth study of a single outstanding philosopher, chosen by the instructor. The focus of the course will be announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 326
Philosophy of Language

An analysis of the concept of language in both the works of philosophers and the works of linguists. The course looks into theories of linguistic meaning, sentence structure, speech acts, and the assumptions underlying research in modern linguistics.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 328
Comparative Philosophy

This course draws upon two or more widely different traditions in considering one or more topics of philosophical interest. Usually, the course will include both Western and non-Western sources. The course may be organized around a given philosophical issue or may compare and contrast two or more thinkers from the relevant traditions.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 332
Political Philosophy

Examination of different conceptions of legitimate political authority; includes discussion of ideas of social justice, natural rights, sovereignty.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 333
Social Philosophy

A systematic examination of contemporary Social issues such as abortion, euthanasia, war, environmental destruction, poverty, terrorism, and sexual morality.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 336
Metaphysics

Metaphysics.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 341
Philosophy of Science

Through an analysis of the concepts of explanation, theory, hypothesis, experiment, and observation, this course seeks an understanding of how the growth of scientific knowledge is possible.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 342
Philosophy of Mind

An examination of the conception of "mind" as opposed to body implications for psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuroscience.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 343
Philosophy of Social Inquiry

An examination of the methods and theories of the social sciences, especially sociology and anthropology, and their relationships to the natural sciences.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 350
Science and Method

A history of interaction between science and philosophy showing how changing conceptions of metaphysics and scientific method have influenced the development of Renaissance astronomy, nineteenth century atomic theory, ether theories, theories of geological and biological change, etc.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 351
Science and Values

This course will consider questions such as: What role should values play in scientific inquiry? Should scientists consider only epistemic or cognitive values, or should they also take into account social and cultural values? Could science be objective and make progress if it is shaped by social and cultural values?.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 360
Ethics

A study of the fundamental issues of moral philosophy.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 362
Philosophy of Law

An analysis of the concept of law and how it differs from custom, religion, and morality. The course looks into issues of judicial reasoning, the assumptions that underlie the criminal justice system and the imposition of liability, and legal ethics.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 363
Aesthetics

The philosophy of the fine arts, including an analysis of the concepts of beauty, representation, expression and the purpose of art.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 370
Engineering Ethics

A study of the problems of moral and social responsibility for the engineering profession, including such topics as safety, confidentiality and government regulation.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 371
Ethics in Architecture

A study of the moral problems architects must resolve in the practice of their profession, including problems of confidentiality, candor, esthetics, and economy arising from the special responsibilities of architects to and public, client, employer, and colleagues.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 373
Business Ethics

Ethical issues relating to individual and corporate responsibility, self and governmental regulation, investment, advertising, urban problems, the environment, preferential hiring.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 374
Ethics in Computer Science

Moral problems that confront professionals in computer-related fields, including questions raised by the concept of intellectual property and its relationship to computer software, professional codes of ethics for computer use, responsibility for harm resulting from the misuse of computers.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 380
Topics in Philosophy

An investigation into a topic of current interest in philosophy; which will be announced by the instructor when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Humanities (H)
PHIL 491
Independent Study

Supervised individual research for advanced students. **Instructor permission required.**

Prerequisite(s): HUM 102 or HUM 104 or HUM 106 or HUM 200-299
Credit: Variable
Satisfies: Humanities (H)
PHIL 551
Science and Values

This course will consider questions such as: What role should values play in scientific inquiry? Should scientists consider only epistemic or cognitive values, or should they take into account social and cultural values? Could science be objective and make progress if it is shaped by social and cultural values?.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHIL 560
Ethics

A study of the fundamental issues of moral philosophy.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHIL 570
Engineering Ethics

A study of moral and social responsibility for the engineering profession including such topics as safety, confidentiality, and government regulation.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHIL 571
Ethics in Architecture

A study of the moral problems architects must resolve in the practice of their profession, including problems of confidentiality, candor, esthetics, and economy, arising from the special responsibilities of architects to the public, client, employer, and colleagues.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHIL 573
Business Ethics

Ethical issues relating to individual and corporate responsibility, self and governmental regulation, investment, advertising, urban problems, the environment, and preferential hiring.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHIL 574
Ethics in Computer Science

Moral problems that confront professionals in computer-related fields, including questions raised by the concept of intellectual property and its relationship to computer software, professional codes of ethics for computer use, and responsibility for harm resulting from the misuse of computers.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHIL 580
Topics in Philosophy

An investigation into a topic of current or enduring interest in philosophy, which will be announced by the instructor when the course is scheduled. Graduate standing required.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHIL 597
Special Problems in Philosophy

Advanced topics in the study of philosophy, in which there is special student and faculty interest. Variable Credit: 1-6 Prerequisite: Instructor permission required.

Credit: Variable
PHIL 691
Research and Dissertation

This a research hours course for PhD candidates who need to consult with a philosopher on their dissertation.

Credit: Variable