Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 100
Introduction to the Profession

Students will: 1) introduce an overview of concepts in psychology; 2) develop professional direction for academic career at IIT; 3) demonstrate psychology information literacy; 4) demonstrate effective communication using a variety of formats; and 5) demonstrate professional competence both within and outside of IIT.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PSYC 203
Undergraduate Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

The objectives of this course are to develop skills in using statistical data analysis commonly used in the behavioral sciences (e.g. descriptive statistics, ANOVA, regression, correlation, and meta-analysis). At the end of the course students should be able to comprehend statistical research findings, run basic statistical analysis, as well as make inferences from the results.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 1 Credits: 4
PSYC 204
Research Methods in Behavioral Science

Introduction to experimental, survey, and field study methodology, including: ethics; research design; collection, preparation, analysis of data; and writing research reports.

Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 221 or PSYC 222) and PSYC 203
Lecture: 3 Lab: 1 Credits: 4
Satisfies: Communications (C), Natural Science (N)
PSYC 221
Introduction to Psychological Science

Psychologists use the scientific method to understand the behavior and mental processes of individuals. Their investigations into understanding the behavior of individuals span multiple areas including perception, learning, cognition, language, development, motivation, personality, psychological disorders, social, health, and industrial/organization. In addition to the variety of fields, psychology examines behavior at multiple levels such as biological, behavioral, and cultural. This course will: 1) introduce the field of psychological science; 2) explore the research methods psychologists use to answer questions; 3) use research and theory to introduce psychological processes in multiple fields; and 4) to apply psychological theories to mass media.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 238
Professional Skills

Didactic and applied approach to professional skill development in the areas of oral communication, conflict management and interpersonal dimensions of the work setting.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 250
Introduction to Leadership: Concepts and Practices

A survey of historical and contemporary theories, concepts and complexities associated with leadership. Emphasis will be placed on application of theories to practical experiences of leadership.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 301
Industrial Psychology

Survey of practical applications of psychology to problems of business and industry: work attitudes and behavior; employee selection; morale; safety; turnover; absenteeism; and training.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 303
Abnormal Psychology

Overview of various cognitive, emotional, and behavioral disorders, focusing on diagnostic criteria, causal factors, and treatment, and emphasizing scientific, research-oriented perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 190-299 or SOC 190-299 or PS 190-298
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 310
Social Psychology

Description and analysis of behavior and experience as determined by social conditions. Includes social issues, human relations, prejudice, and leadership.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 312
Human Motivation and Emotion

This course will provide a broad overview of major theories of human motivation, both historical and contemporary. After learning about these theories, students will explore how researchers have applied these principles in health care, sports, management, education, and virtual/gaming environments.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 320
Applied Correlation and Regression

This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to apply correlation and regression analysis to the study of human behavior. Emphasis will be placed on practical issues associated with these statistical techniques and significant attention will be paid to running analyses and reporting results.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 330
Health Psychology

Health psychology applies psychological principles to health promotion and the prevention and treatment of illness. The goal of this course is to provide a thorough understanding of the key concepts and theories important to health psychologists and the skills to think analytically and critically about health issues. The course will cover a broad range of topics including stress, coping, and behaviors that promote health and prevent illness. The course will also cover specific health problems such as HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, eating disorders, and substance abuse and critically examine the underlying biological, psychological, and social factors influencing the onset, course, and outcomes of these diseases.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PSYC 350
Prejudice and Stigma

People differ in the identities they hold across dimensions like race, religion, gender, sexuality, age, ability and socioeconomic status. These identities can be stigmatized within the larger group and have profound effects on people. In this course, we will consider the function and costs of prejudice and stigma for members of both stigmatized and majority (nonstigmatized) groups as well as review research aimed at reducing prejudice and stigma. This course aims to give students the skills necessary to critically understand contemporary instances of prejudice and stigmatization from a social psychological perspective. Another course objective is for students to draw parallels across stigma and prejudice processes while also understanding nuances for each group. A final objective is to give students the opportunity to reflect on personally held beliefs about diverse groups.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 352
Personality Theory

This course will provide an overview of prominent approaches to personality psychology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 355
Cross-Cultural Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize you with a wide range of topics in cross-cultural psychology. The ability to understand the influence of culture is essential for success in an increasingly diverse and global society. This course will expose you to a variety of topics such as cross-cultural communication, diversity in the workplace, personality and national traits and happiness across cultures. The aim is to provide a framework for appreciating the cultural context of psychological phenomenon in order to facilitate better navigation of diverse societies and workplaces.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 360
Clinical Psychology: Assessment and Treatment

This course will provide an overview of psychological testing and assessment and psychotherapy and professional activities of clinical psychologists. This course will provide an in-depth examination of the concepts and methods of clinical psychology, document the many activities of clinical psychologists, and highlight the trends in the filed that are likely to shape the field in upcoming years. Students will gain an increased understanding of the psychological services and information about clinical psychology as a future career goal.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 303*, An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 363
Introduction to Sports Psychology

In this course, students will explore the major psychological theories related to sport and exercise behavior. The course is designed to introduce students to the field of sport and exercise psychology through a combination of classroom discussion and exercise application. This course will provide students with a broad overview of major topics including: the history of sports and exercise psychology; foundations of personality, self-concept, self-esteem, motivation, and other psychological characteristics related to participation and performance in sports; coaching and leadership in sports; gender and cultural issues; team dynamics; performance enhancement strategies; and sports as recreation.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 370
Occupational Health Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize you with a wide range of topics in occupational health psychology (OHP). Understanding the relationship between work and health is vital in the face of increasingly demanding and complex work. This course will expose you to topics that examine how work affects our health and vice versa. These include work organizational factors (organizational justice, dark workplace behaviors such as incivility, shift-work, work-family interface) and their impact on employee health and well-being (stress, emotions, job-burnout, recovery experiences).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 380
Topics in Psychology

An investigation into a topic of current interest in psychology. The specific topic will be announced by the instructor when the course is scheduled.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 381
Topics in Psychology

An investigation into a topic of current interest in psychology. The specific topic will be announced by the instructor when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 or PSYC 301 or PSYC 303 or PSYC 310
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 409
Psychological Testing

This course is designed to introduce you to psychological testing and assessment. After completing this course, you will be familiar with the test development process, testing techniques, and different types of tests. Further, you will learn about the use of tests in educational, organizational, and clinical/counseling settings. In this course, you will learn the underlying principles of psychological testing and measurement including test construction and scale development.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203 or PSYC 221 or PSYC 301
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 410
Introduction to Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

Historical, philosophical, ethical, and legal bases of rehabilitation and mental health counseling. Includes a study of professional roles, functions, and responsibilities as well as service delivery systems and practices such as vocational, independent living, and public and private rehabilitation and mental health counseling.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 411
Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions

Survey of human organ systems, medical terminology, unique characteristics of disabling conditions, including severe disabilities. Vocational consequences, environmental impact and implications for the rehabilitation process. One of a two course sequence.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 or PSYC 222
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
PSYC 412
Multicultural and Psychosocial Issues in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

Review of diversity issues in rehabilitation and mental health counseling including culture, disability, gender, aging, socio-economic status, and spirituality and religion. Includes theories of multicultural counseling and the counselor's role in the promotion of self-awareness and social justice; a study of individual and family adaptation and coping processes following disability; psychological and sociological consequences of disability; attitudes toward persons with disabilities; and the impact of social and environmental barriers.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 222
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 414
Neural and Biological Bases of Behavior

An introduction to the biological bases of behavior with an emphasis on neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of sensory and central nervous systems.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
PSYC 423
Learning Theory

Learning plays an important role in psychology and the general processes and mechanisms that underscore learning are utilized in a number of fields including neuroscience, clinical science, education, and cognitive science. We will examine several theoretical perspectives on learning including, but not limited to, functionalistic, associationistic, cognitive, social, and neurophysiological. We will also examine how factors such as motivation, artificial intelligence, technology, disability, and intelligence play a role in learning.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 426
Cognitive Science

The goal of this course is to understand how the mind works. Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary field that draws on experimental psychology, computer science, linguistics, animal behavior, neuroscience, and behavioral economics, among others.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 222
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 435
Child Development

Developmental psychologists examine behavioral and biological changes as they occur over the entire lifespan. Their investigations into mechanisms of developmental change span biological, behavioral, and cultural levels of organization. Students will be able (1) to identify the major milestones of development in various domains (e.g. perceptual, motor, cognitive, social) and (2) use research and theory to understand the mechanisms by which developmental change occurs.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 436
Adult Development

Explores processes and changes in cognitive, social, physical and emotional functioning across adult life. Requires 9 hours of psychology.

Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 221 and PSYC 303) or PSYC 301 or PSYC 310
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 449
Practicum in Rehabilitation Services

Seminar and supervised fieldwork experience in a rehabilitation setting with disabled individuals. Emphasizes service delivery, interviewing techniques, and caseload management.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 480 and PSYC 412* and PSYC 411 and PSYC 410, An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 455
Development and Evaluation of Training in Organizations

The goal of this course is to provide the learner with a systems perspective to training in organizations. Through readings, discussions, in class exercises and project work students will learn to identify organizational issues that can be solved using a training intervention and develop appropriate training. The focus of the course will primarily be on knowledge application. Students will learn about the various steps involved in designing a training program including needs assessment, influence of learner characteristics, transfer of training and training evaluation. Through project work students will gain skills in implementing these steps.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 or PSYC 301
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 456
Engineering Psychology

Theory of human physical and psychological abilities as they relate to design of transportation, housing, workplace, defense and recreational systems. Topics include theories relating to psychophysiology, anthropometry, communications, man-machine interactions, training, maintainability, safety, and engineering evaluation.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 460
Child and Adolescent Disorders

This course focuses on the major disorders that are evident in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. A developmental psychopathology approach will be used in which major influences on both normal and abnormal child development will be examined. Students will be exposed to the contextual and socioemotional factors that impact children's development, followed by an in-depth discussion of the various disorders.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 303
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 465
Behavior Change Principles and Practice

Students will learn about theories of behavior and apply scientific principles used to promote behavior change. Major topics will include stages of change, motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral techniques, and contingency management (reward and punishment). Emphasis will be given to altering pathological behaviors and to promoting healthy lifestyle changes in the context of one on one or small group settings.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 303
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 481
Groups and Leadership at Work

The course will review a system's model of groups and will discuss developmental stages of groups as they relate to communication behaviors. It will also review various approaches to leadership including individual, contingency, and relationship. The course engages students in various activities to help them become aware of themselves as team members and team leaders.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 301
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 482
Undergraduate Research Seminar I

An introduction to applied research in psychology. Includes a didactic review of basic and current issues in psychological research as well as an experiential component. Students actively participate in ongoing faculty research programs and are exposed to all areas of research.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 204
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
PSYC 483
Undergraduate Research Seminar II

An introduction to applied research in psychology. Includes a didactic review of basic and current issues in psychological research as well as an experiential component. Students actively participate in ongoing faculty research programs and are exposed to all areas of research.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 222 and PSYC 204
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
PSYC 485
Senior Capstone Project I

The Psychology Capstone Project is an independent study that consists of a formal project and may include a research component, a literature review component as well as a data analysis component or may include an internship or fellowship experience as discussed by you and your project advisor. The project should incorporate and expand upon the depth of knowledge gained from previous years of study and include predetermined deliverables which may include a final thesis or poster. The project should focus on an area of psychology that is of interest to you as a means to expand your knowledge on the subject and to solidify your future goals.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 486
Senior Capstone Project II

Continuation of the Psychology Capstone Project. This is an independent study that consists of a formal project and may include a research component, a literature review component as well as a data analysis component or may include an internship or fellowship experience as discussed by you and your project advisor. The project should incorporate and expand upon the depth of knowledge gained from previous years of study and include predetermined deliverables which may include a final thesis or poster. The project should focus on an area of psychology that is of interest to you as a means to expand your knowledge on the subject and to solidify your future goals.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 487
Integrative Psychology Seminar I

A synthesis of issues and areas in psychology. Requires 21 credit hours in psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 488
Integrative Psychology Seminar II

Seminar integrating seminal and cutting edge psychological writings both empirical and conceptual to address key issues in contemporary psychology. Requires 24 credits in psychology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 489
Undergraduate Psychology Seminar

Reports and discussion of current problems and issues in psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 204
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 497
Special Problems

Independent study involving compilation and analysis of data bearing on a significant problem. **Instructor permission required.**

Credit: Variable
PSYC 498
Advanced Research

Advanced research for BSMP students.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 6 Credits: 3
PSYC 501
Biological Bases of Behavior

A critical review of the anatomical and neurophysiological bases of behavior as related to theory and practice in psychology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 502
Social Bases of Behavior

Critical overview of theory and research in social cognition, interpersonal relations, group dynamics and organizational psychology. Implications of principles for issues and problems in real-world social systems are developed.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 503
Learning and Cognition

Overview of theory and research in topics related to learning, communication, attention, perception, memory, reasoning, and decision making. Emphasis will be placed on connecting theoretical perspectives to real-world applications.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 504
Individual and Cultural Differences

Review of the basic models used to explore and explain how and why people differ from each other. The course will explore the influence of culture and individual characteristics such as gender, ability and personality, as well as how these influences change over a person's lifetime.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 505
History and Systems of Psychology

Critical and conceptual evaluation of influential philosophical and psychological theories of human behavior: From the Greek bronze age to the modern era.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 506
Therapy I

Basic clinical skills including intake, suicide assessment, case formulation, differential diagnosis, and basics of conducting cognitive behavioral therapy. Taken when not preceded by PSYC 518 (Basic Clinical Skills).

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 507
Therapy II

Second semester seminar and supervised training in basic clinical skills, including interviewing, development of a therapeutic relationship, managing the process of therapy and assessing therapy progress. Requires active standing in the clinical program and approved clinical placement.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 506
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 508
Ethics and Professional Issues I

This is an introductory course designed around ethical issues confronting clinical psychologists. It is offered to incoming first year clinical students to allow them to think about ethical issues in treatment, assessment, and professional behavior. Using the APA ethics code as a guide, students present and respond to ethical dilemmas that they may face as they embark upon their career as clinical psychologists. Other professional issues are also discussed including the transition to graduate school, course selection decisions, and any other general graduate school questions that may arise.

Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Credits: 2
PSYC 509
Ethics and Professional Issues II

This is a continuation of PSYC 508 but offered to second semester, third year students. It is designed to prepare students for the later parts of the graduate student experience. Topics include dissertation research, the internship experience, early job and career decisions, supervision, and consultation. Barriers to successful completion of the program are discussed and problem solved. Ethical issues such as those confronting new Ph.D.'s are also introduced.

Lecture: 1 Lab: 0 Credits: 1
PSYC 510
Clinical Assessment I

Seminar and supervised training in intellectual and cognitive assessment for adults and children. Research, psychometric characteristics, conceptual foundations, clinical applicability, administration, scoring and interpretation of major assessment instruments, and writing reports. Requires active standing in the clinical program. Instructor permission required.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 511
Psychometric Theory

Basic understanding of principles and theories of psychological measurement emphasizing (1) theories and methods for estimation of reliability and validity, (2) techniques for the measurement of psychological variables and (3), methods for construction of psychological and educational measuring instruments.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 546 and PSYC 545
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 512
Clinical Assessment II

Seminar and supervised training in personality assessment of adults and children. Research, psychometric characteristics, conceptual foundations, clinical applicability, administration, scoring and interpretation of major assessment instruments, and writing reports.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 510
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 513
Assessment in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

An overview of test selection, administration, and interpretation through synthesis, integration, and evaluation of assessment data used in rehabilitation and mental health counseling. Includes historical perspectives in assessment, statistical concepts, an orientation to standardized and non-standardized tests, and the process and practice of assessing adults with disabling conditions for rehabilitation plan development and vocational decision-making.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 514
Vocational Evaluation II: Report Development and Communication

The process of developing vocational evaluation and staffing reports. Gathering, analyzing, integrating, synthesizing, and interpreting evaluation information. Development of feasible recommendations utilizing related sources of labor market/ occupational information.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 513
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 515
Vocational Evaluation Laboratory

Practical skills in vocational evaluations including application of work samples and situational assessment at a vocational evaluation site in the community.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 517
Performance Appraisal Seminar

The objectives of the seminar are to 1) provide a broad understanding of the multiple facets of performance appraisal, 2) understand research and advances in the field, and 3) understand the challenges and pitfalls of successfully implementing a PA system in an organization.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 556 and PSYC 529
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 518
Basic Clinical Skills

This course covers introductory therapy skills including intake, suicide assessment, case formulation, and differential diagnosis.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 526
Lecture: 1 Lab: 0 Credits: 1
PSYC 519
Therapy I-A

Basics of conducting cognitive behavioral therapy following PSYC 518 (Basic Clinical Skills).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 518
Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Credits: 2
PSYC 520
Health Psychology

Introduction to theoretical, clinical and research issues in adult behavioral medicine. Covers general perspectives of a biobehavioral approach, factors affecting adult health and illness, diagnostic and treatment approaches, and issues in research and application.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 523
Theories of Psychotherapy

Survey of various approaches to therapeutic intervention. The conceptual bases, history, methods, empirical foundations and applicability of important schools of therapeutic intervention will be considered.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 524
Assessment and Treatment of Infants and Young Children

Reviews current conceptualizations, assessment and treatment of childhood disorders from a behavioral-system perspective. Examines the impact of the family, school and other relevant systems on the development and treatment of child behavior problems.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 525
Developmental Psychopathology

This course covers theory and research on developmental processes and their functions to promote health and as risk factors for psychopathology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 526
Psychopathology

Critical examination of clinical and experimental research in psychopathology and diagnostic classification systems.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 529
Personnel Selection and Evaluation

Principles and techniques of employee selection and placement. Analysis of test data which will maximize the effectiveness of such techniques.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 530
Contemporary Issues in Industrial Organizational Psychology

The overall objectives of this seminar are to (a) provide exposure to the theoretical and applied literatures on meta-analysis, and (b) develop skills in critiquing and conducting meta-analyses. The major areas of theory and research that will be examined in this course include (a) the conceptual and measurement literatures focusing on individual difference constructs, (b) an introduction to classical reliability theory and statistical theory underlying meta-analysis procedures, and (c) studies evaluating the generalizability of relationships involving individual differences and situational variables. Additionally, the course also discusses concepts related to utility analysis (with particular attention paid to intersections with meta-analytic work).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 529 and PSYC 556 and PSYC 546
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 531
Organizational Attitudes and Behavioral Seminar

The course is an in-depth study of factors that affect Organizational behavior and attitude (motivational theories). The various key attitudes and behaviors that organizations are defined and research relating to them is discussed (e.g. job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job involvement, turnover, absenteeism, and organizational citizenship). We also identify the stresses on today's employees' life and discuss some ways to manage them (e.g. job stress, work-family conflict, minority and immigrant worker.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 556
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 532
Occupational Health Psychology

This survey course is designed to provide a broad overview of the field of occupational health psychology (OHP). OHP is an exciting field that examines the bidirectional relationship between work psychology on the one hand and individual and organizational health on the other. We will review major theories and empirical research linking work and organizational factors (organizational justice, dark workplace behaviors such as incivility, shift-work, work-family interface) with employee health and well-being (stress, affect, job-burnout, recovery experiences) along with interventions and experiences designed to promote occupational health.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 556
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 533
Clinical Practicum

Clinical assessment, therapy and/or consultation in a community-based mental health setting or medical facility for an average of 15 to 20 hours per week, per semester. Students obtain supervised experience in the provision of psychological services and related professional activities. Must be in an approved clinical placement site.

Credit: Variable
PSYC 534
Attachment Theory Throughout the Lifespan

Provides an in depth understanding of attachment theory and research, as well as clinical applications throughout the life span. Instructor permission required.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 535
Seminar in Personnel Selection

A critical review of advanced techniques in personnel selection. Includes such topics such as validity generalization, utility analysis, and applications of latent trait theory.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 511
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 536
Affective Disorders

Examination of current theory and research regarding affective disorders. Covers cognitive, behavioral, biological, and cultural perspectives. The relationship of affective symptomatology and diagnosis to other types of psychopathology are considered.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 526
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 537
Child Cognitive Development

The course is designed to be a practical primer on the changes in cognition that occur from ages five to seven when there is a major change in how children perceive their world and how the world perceives them.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 538
Psychology of Sport, Performance, and Health

The course examines the clinical and research literature on the physical and psychological benefits of the following: regular physical activity; psychological, social, and environmental aspects of exercise non-adherence; and mental and behavioral strategies for promoting motivation, confidence, concentration, and enhanced sport performance.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 540
Research Methods

This course prepares students for designing and interpreting empirical research. The collection of meaningful data, appropriate use of data analytic techniques, and the interpretation of data results are presented.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 545
Graduate Statistics I

Basic course in elementary statistics Introduction to inferential statistics and statistical analysis of psychological data. Emphasis on hypothesis testing procedures and computer applications.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 546
Graduate Statistics II

Statistical procedures used in the prediction and explanation of psychological data, including multiple regression. Emphasis on computer applications.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 545
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 547
Evidence-Based Practice in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with evidence-based practice (EBP) in the field of rehabilitation and mental health counseling. Students will be introduced to a variety of evidence-based models in rehabilitation and mental health counseling as well as current issues in EBP. The historical development of EBP will be explored, and current empirical research will be examined.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 548
Vocational Psychiatric Rehabilitation

An in depth review of models available to help people with severe mental illness obtain and maintain employment. Topics relating to vocational evaluation, work adjustment, placement, supported work models, and follow-up will be covered.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 549
Practicum in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

Seminar and supervised experience in rehabilitation and mental health counseling with an emphasis on development of individual counseling skills. Students work in a field-based rehabilitation and mental health counseling capacity carrying a small client caseload while participating in weekly individual and group supervision. Includes topics related to counseling processes, procedures, and theories; ethics; and crisis prevention, assessment, and intervention.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 410 and PSYC 557 and PSYC 523
Credit: Variable
PSYC 550
Couples Research and Therapy

Advanced seminar introduces students to empirically based interventions for couples. Presents clinically relevant and empirically derived material to better understand the importance of both technique and theory when intervening at a couples level.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 552
Legal Issues in Human Resource Management

Seminar on the legal context of human resource management, focusing on equal employment opportunity laws. Will discuss how to design employee selection, evaluation and compensation systems that comply with U.S. federal laws and regulations.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 529
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 553
Family and Couples Therapy

Surveys the major theoretical perspectives for understanding and intervening with family and marital problems.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 554
Survey of Multivariate Statistics

Introduction to the major multivariate statistical procedures used in psychology; factor analysis, discriminant analysis, multivariate analysis of variance and canonical correlation.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 545 or PSYC 546
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 555
Seminar in Industrial Training

Survey of various types of training and development programs used in industry. Also included are related major issues, specific techniques, assessment of training needs and evaluation of training programs.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 556 and PSYC 529
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 556
Organizational Psychology

Theory and research concerning human behavior in formal organizations, communication nets, dynamics of managerial jobs; current ideas concerning organizations.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 557
Pre-Practicum in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

Study of the counseling process within a multicultural society. Includes essential interviewing and counseling techniques, counselor characteristics and behaviors, and ethical considerations in counseling with an orientation toward wellness and empowerment.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 558
Industrial Psychology Internship I

Supervised experience in psychological practices in an industrial setting. (Credit: variable)

Credit: Variable
PSYC 559
Industrial Psychology Internship II

Supervised experience in psychological practices in an industrial setting. (credit: Variable)

Credit: Variable
PSYC 561
Applied Counseling Techniques: Group Counseling

Methods and techniques in the group counseling process including group facilitation and leadership. Provides a theoretical and experiential understanding of group purpose, development, dynamics, theories, methods, skills, and other group approaches in a multicultural society with an emphasis on working with persons with disabilities within a family/systems framework.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 523*, An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 562
Job Placement

Techniques of job development, job analysis, job placement, job seeking skills and follow-up. Includes affirmative action, manpower, and legislative programs involving job placement of special groups.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 563
Human Growth and Career Development

Presentation and discussion of human growth and career development theories across life span with special emphasis on persons with disabilities. Includes the nature and needs of persons at all developmental levels and in multicultural contexts with specific focus on biological bases of behavior, learning and personality development, transitioning, career decision making, and the family/system in?uences on vocational choice.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 564
Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling Research Seminar

The primary objective of this course is to help students become familiar with rehabilitation and mental health counseling research, acquire the basic knowledge and skills for designing and conducting applied research, and develop a preliminary research proposal for their research project. A secondary purpose is to teach students to critically evaluate rehabilitation and mental health counseling research in order to inform evidence-based practice. Includes an overview of various research designs, data analysis techniques, and the use of SPSS for statistical analysis as well as principles and models of program evaluation and the use of findings to effect program modifications.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 566
Addictive Behaviors and Principles of Behavior Change

A review of theoretical models of addiction and behavior from sociological, biological, and psychological perspectives. Critical examination of research methodology and empirically supported clinical approaches. Emphasis on substance and process addictions.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 571
Structural Equation Modeling

This is an introductory course to structural equation modeling (SEM). Following completion of this course, students should be able to (1) conduct analyses of measurement, structural, and full models, (2) model interactions in SEM, (3) understand how SEM can be used to model growth curves, (4) communicate results of SEM analyses in both written and oral form, and (5) critically evaluate the application of SEM in published research.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 554
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 573
Psychosocial Bases: Disability and Behavior

Presentation and discussion of psychological and social issues of disability and human behavior. Somatopsychology, field integrative theories and psychological aspects of disabilities. Consent of instructor.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 575
Adult Career Development and Vocational Behavior

Presentation and discussion of impact of disabilities on adult career development. Vocational development theories, occupational information and analysis, career counseling and research methodology.Instructor permission required.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 576
Research in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

This course teaches students to develop a preliminary research proposal for a research project based in areas of rehabilitation and mental health counseling. This course also prepares students for designing research investigations, collecting data sets, utilizing data analytic techniques, and interpreting empirical research.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 564
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 577
Professional and Ethical Issues in Rehabilitation and Counseling

Presentation and discussion of issues related to professional and ethical practice in the fields of rehabilitation and counseling. History and philosophy of rehabilitation and counseling, professional and ethical standards, leadership and advocacy, concerns in rehabilitation assessment, counseling and related professional concerns, and placement and independent living.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 578
Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling Internship I

Supervised experience in rehabilitation and mental health counseling, which is intended to reflect the comprehensive work experience of a professional counselor. Students are provided the opportunity to become familiar with a variety of professional activities and resources in addition to direct service (e.g., record keeping, assessment instruments, supervision, information and referral, in-service, and staff meetings).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 549
Credit: Variable
PSYC 579
Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling Internship II

Supervised experience in rehabilitation and mental health counseling, which is intended to reflect the comprehensive work experience of a professional counselor. Students are provided the opportunity to become familiar with a variety of professional activities and resources in addition to direct service (e.g., record keeping, assessment instruments, supervision, information and referral, in-service, and staff meetings).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 549
Credit: Variable
PSYC 580
Seminar in Leadership

Reviews models and theories of leadership that cover group dynamics, power, influence, and conflict management as well as issues of diversity and gender. The focus is on research and practical issues in understanding leadership and its effectiveness. Requires certification as K-12 teacher or approval of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 556
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 581
Neuropsychologicial Assessment

Seminar in neuropsychological assessment. A review of neuroanatomy followed with a review of the conceptual foundations of brain-behavior relationships. Major assessment instruments will be covered.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 582
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback

Reviews applications of physiological measures to practical problems. Clinical applications of biofeedback are discussed and demonstrated. Special emphasis on electromyographic techniques.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 583
Rehabilitation Engineering Technology I: Survey of Interdisciplinary Application of RET

An overview of Assistive Technology (AT) used by people with disabilities. Includes contact with local AT sites, consumers and practicing professionals. Reviews specific AT applications for communication, mobility and control; national and local AT resources; and economics of AT development, marketing and service delivery. Design, engineering, and architectural issues relevant to people with disabilities are introduced.Instructor permission required.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 584
Rehabilitation Engineering Technology II: Access to Independence Through Assistive Technology

Seminar designed for deeper exploration of Assistive Technology issues introduced in PSYC 583. Special focus on accessibility issues, technology outreach and awareness training; additional topics are chosen to reflect the specific interests of students in the class. Buildings are surveyed using ADAAG criteria for accessibility.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 583
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 585
Rehabilitation Engineering Technology III

Seminar designed to accompany and enhance practical RET experiences, such as concurrent internship, employment or approved projects involving RET/AT applications. Case presentations of technology for independent living, issues of quality of outcome, alternatives/appropriateness of technology solutions, ethics, emotional aspects of technology acquisition, independence/dependency and barriers to acquiring and deployment of AT are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 584 and PSYC 583
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 586
Concepts of Supervision

Explores formulations of the supervisory relationship and critical issues in the supervision of clinicians.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 588
Graduate Psychology Seminar

Reports and discussion of current problems and issues in psychology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 589
Rehabilitation Internship III

Supervised experience in rehabilitation counseling. (Credit: Variable)

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 549
Credit: Variable
PSYC 590
Psychiatric Rehabilitation

Class covers a wide range of topics including a review of the disease and disability models of mental illness, skills training components in treatment, incentive strategies for participants, transfer of learned skills to other situations, and cognitive rehabilitation strategies.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 591
Research and Thesis M.S.

Instructor permission required.

Credit: Variable
PSYC 594
Special Projects

Instructor permission required.

Credit: Variable
PSYC 595
Graduate Research Project

Independent research for PhD students who are required to complete a thesis equivalent project. Instructor permission required.

Credit: Variable
PSYC 597
Special Problems

Instructor permission required.

Credit: Variable
PSYC 599
Clinical Internship

Ph.D. Comprehensive Exam Participation in full-time internship accredited by the American Psychological Association, or, in exceptional cases, approved by the clinical Psychology program. Approval of dissertation proposal and instructor permission required.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 1 Credits: 1
PSYC 600
Continuation of Residency

Continuation of residency.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 1 Credits: 1
PSYC 691
Research and Thesis Ph.D.

Research and thesis for Ph. D. students.

Credit: Variable
PSYC 710
Compensation and Benefit Application

Compensation and benefit application.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 711
Multilevel Data Analysis

Review of statistical methods for analysis of data at multiple levels of aggregation, such as individual and group-level phenomena. The course will cover conceptual issues, statistical models, and data analysis using computer software.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 712
Bayley Scales of Infant Development

Bayley Scales of Infant Development.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 1
PSYC 714
Assessment Centers

This course will develop the knowledge and skills needed for the design and implementation of assessment centers and other individual assessment methods.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 715
Organizational Assessment and Planning

This short course focuses on various processes and tools used in organizations to assess effectiveness, establishing priorities, and creating plans of action for change. Topics include the strategic planning process and the development and use of assessment tools such as organizational surveys and focus groups. Requires basic knowledge of statistics.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 716
Base Pay Management

This course provides an in-depth discussion of the principles, design, implementation and evaluation of an employee base-pay program. Topics include concepts for determining market position using salary surveys, the design of base pay structures, principles of merit pay, and the ongoing management of base pay programs.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 717
Variable Pay Programs

This course provides an in-depth review of variable pay programs within organizations, including incentives, recognition programs and team-based pay. Organization-wide, organizational unit, and individual programs will be discussed in terms of plan design, implementation and evaluation.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 719
Fundamentals of Employee Benefits Programs

This course will address all aspects of employee benefits programs including government regulations, health and welfare plans, retirement plans and pay for time not worked. Case studies will be used to model real-life situations encountered by Human Resources professionals.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 720
Individual Assessment for Industrial/Organizational Psychology

This course is designed to teach students how to assess individuals for hire, promotion, and development. Students will develop a testing protocol including a structured interview, cognitive ability, and personality testing. The course will provide applied experience conducing assessments of executives who have volunteered to serve as testing subjects. Interviewing skill, test interpretation, and report writing are the primary learning objectives of the course.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 721
Network Analysis

Network analyses focuses on relationships between social entities (e.g. individuals, groups, businesses) and has been used in a number of fields including the social and behavioral sciences. The primary focus will center on social network analysis, which has been developed from an interdisciplinary approach from sociology, psychology, and economics. This course will present an introduction to various methods and concepts of social network analysis including applications in the social and behavioral sciences using these methods. Topics include, but are not limited to, graph theory, properties of individuals, subgroups/cliques, blockmodels, and dyad/triad analysis. An introduction to network models and applications in common software programs will also be given.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 546 and PSYC 545
Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 722
Consulting Fundamentals

The course will focus on identifying customer groups, developing products or services, pricing, proposal writing, and ethics in consulting.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 782
Assitive Technology for Counselors

Intensive one-week overview of Assistive Technology with a focus on vocational applications. Includes visitations to working assistive technology sites, and lectures by consumers and specialists (including several of national prominence) in various areas of AT. Instructor permission required.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5
PSYC 783
Vocational Applications of AT

Internet based distance class designed to follow PSYC 782 and further develop the student's knowledge of AT and the skill in applying AT to solve practical problems for persons with disabilities. Applies knowledge AT service delivery presented in PSYC 782 to issues in the student's local region. Identifies AT needs of persons with disabilities and weaknesses, strengths, and gaps in local region's AT service delivery, with emphasis on vocational applications. Instructor permission required.

Lecture: 1.5 Lab: 0 Credits: 1.5