Social Sciences (SSCI)

SSCI 100
Introduction to the Profession

The course introduces students to social science professions, career possibilities, and the range of skill sets utilized by professionals in the field.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 204
States, Markets, and Society

This course examines theoretical explanations for the relationship between governments, society, and the global economy. It considers structural industrial shifts and the impact of technology on production, economic competitiveness and social welfare. Themes include labor value, bureaucratic theory, class conflicts and in the internationalization of capital.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 209
Social Science Research Methods

Introduces students to explanation in the social sciences and both qualitative and the quantitative research methods. Topics covered include the formulation of research questions, measurement, data collection, survey research, significance tests, experimental and quasi-experimental design, sampling, and various techniques of qualitative research.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 210
Social and Political Thought

Examines central social and political theories and their ideas concerning the relationship between individual and society, social harmony and conflict, social equality, and the state.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 220
Global Chicago

Through readings, lectures, and field trips to local neighborhoods, this course will look at the ways that Chicago has become a global city and what that means for local government, businesses, educators, and the non-profit sector. The course explores how Chicago has become a node in the global economy and a gateway to immigrants from all over the world.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 225
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

This course introduces students to the use of digital geographic information in reasoning about the world. Topics include geographic data collection and management, geographic data models, and basic geographic analysis. A variety of GIS applications will be described across a range of disciplines with an emphasis on geographic problem solving. The social, economic, and legal context of geographic information will also be examined. Principles and concepts will be provided in lectures and reinforced through a series of hands-on exercises.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 285
Special Topics

Investigates a topic of current interest at the introductory level. Course may be taken multiple times provided the topic is different each time.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 318
Global Health

Multidisciplinary course that addresses the most critical issues and initiatives in global health, covering the history of the field and its basic principles and goals, the determinants of health and its links with development, competing perspectives on global health challenges and ways to meet them, the most important causes of disease and death, and the organizations and governance mechanisms that are endeavoring to improve outcomes. The course is geared toward developing theories and methods to understand the social, economic, political, and environmental causes of health outcomes with a focus on disadvantaged communities and health inequalities.

Prerequisite(s): [(HUM 200-299)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 319
Comparative Health Systems

Surveys and compares health care systems in a range of developed and developing countries. The course examines why countries facing similar health problems have sometimes developed different policy responses, what has been the nature of those policies, and how effective or ineffective they have been. Health insurance, payment methods,the role of providers, the relationship between medicine and culture, and recent reforms and innovations in health care policy are among the topics discussed.

Prerequisite(s): [(HUM 200-299)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 321
Social Inequality

Evaluates the patterns and dimensions of social, economic, and political inequality in American society and how these compare with other societies, who gets ahead and why, the consequences of social stratification, and the outlooks for the future of inequality in developed countries like the United States.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 323
Problems of Multi-Ethnic, Multi-Religious States

Focuses on the political challenges arising in multi-ethnic, multi-religious societies in which there has been substantial conflict or balkanization. Developed and developing countries receive attention.

Prerequisite(s): [(HUM 200-299)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 325
Intermediate Geographic Information Systems

This course builds on introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) and emphasizes GIS spatial modeling skills to solve real world problems. Topics covered include vector and raster data models and conversions, common map algebra functions, surface analysis, 3-D rendering, network analysis, and solve road network problems.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 203) OR (SSCI 225)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 354
Urban Policy

Explores major dilemmas facing cities today including changing economic and tax bases, fiscal stresses, immigration, marginalized populations, new forms of consumption, and adaptation to structural change. Responses of politicians to pressures to develop new policies and leverage the productive capacity of the city and the impact of citizen preferences are analyzed.

Prerequisite(s): [(HUM 200-299)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 355
Regional Economic Development

This course focuses on methods of analyzing why regions differ economically, how they interrelate, and why and how they react to changes in economic policies and conditions. Students will learn about models and metrics of regional structure and growth.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 359
Humans, Ecology, and Environment

Examines the relationship between humans and nature, including reasons for some well-known ecological catastrophes in human history. The course traces changing attitudes to the environment and explores various measures that have been offered to solve problems, for instance, the Green Revolution, sustainable development, renewable energy, "clean" technologies, and the potential social and ecological consequences of these solutions.

Prerequisite(s): [(HUM 200-299)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 376
Global Migration

This course will examine the history of migration and present-day situations in Europe, the Americas, the Asia-Pacific region, Africa, and the Middle East including the policies that let some people in but keep others out. Significant attention will also be paid to the process by which foreign "outsiders" become integrated (or not) in their new home. Course draws on research from political scientists, sociologists, demographers, economists, and anthropologists.

Prerequisite(s): [(HUM 200-299)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 378
The Triple Helix

This course explores government-led research and development (R&D) collaboration across government research institutes, private firms, and universities. This "triple helix" model originated in the 1980s in Japan under the technocratic model, was quickly taken up by Germany, the UK, and the US, and is responsible for the success of innovations ranging from the integrated circuit to household hydrogen production. But, why does it work, and is it always an ideal policy choice? In other words, should private firms be left alone to innovate or should they be coupled with the public sector?.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 380
International Development

This course reviews multidisciplinary perspectives on international development over the last century. It includes a survey of social science theories of development and parallel shifts in the definition of development and development approaches. The role of development stakeholders is also addressed. Topics may include international aid, environmental sustainability, migration, investment, and resources. The course aims to provide students with the necessary knowledge to critically evaluate the successes and failures of current development policies.

Prerequisite(s): [(HUM 200-299)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 385
Special Topics

Investigates an interdisciplinary topic of current interest in the social sciences. Course may be taken multiple times provided the topic is different each time.

Prerequisite(s): [(HUM 200-299)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 387
Fieldwork Methods

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to work on a real-world project that is or will be taking place "in the field."

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 422
Complex Organizations

Introduces students to the significant theoretical frameworks that have emerged over time to describe and explain public and non-profit organizations as well as organizational actors and actions. The seminar includes consideration of relations between organization and its environment, the importance of inter-organizational networks, and the role of power in organizational life.

Prerequisite(s): [(Social Science Course 300-399)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 480
Introduction to Survey Methodology

This course will introduce advanced undergraduate students to the set of principles of survey research design that are the basis of standard practices in the social sciences. The course will discuss how to formulate research questions and develop hypotheses suitable for testing.

Prerequisite(s): [(Social Science Course 300-399)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 486
Planning, Fundraising, and Program Evaluation

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to applied research methodologies which are commonly used by public and non-profit managers to assess the effectiveness of service delivery. We will explore the theoretical underpinnings and practical application of the range activities involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs.

Prerequisite(s): [(PS 300-399) OR (SOC 300-399) OR (SSCI 300-399)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
SSCI 493
Public Service Internship

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to combine classroom theory with practical application through job-related experiences. Students will complete a 120-hour internship with an approved industry, government, or non-profit organization with a work focus which relates to their academic training and career objectives. Instructor permission is required.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
SSCI 580
Introduction to Survey Methodology

This course will introduce advanced undergraduate students to the set of principles of survey research design that are the basis of standard practices in the social sciences. The course will discuss how to formulate research questions and develop hypotheses suitable for testing.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
SSCI 586
Planning, Fundraising, and Program Evaluation

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to applied research methodologies which are commonly used by public and non-profit managers to assess the effectiveness of service delivery. We will explore the theoretical underpinnings and practical application of the range activities involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3