Psychology

3105 South Dearborn
Suite 252
Chicago, IL 60616
312.567.3500
psychology@iit.edu
humansciences.iit.edu/psychology

Chair
Michael Young

Associate Chair
Frank Lane

Faculty with Research Interests
For information regarding faculty visit the Department of Psychology website.

The Department of Psychology offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Psychology, Applied Analytics, Behavioral Health and Wellness, and Consumer Research, Analytics, and Communications.

Designed for highly motivated, career-oriented students, the degree programs offered by the Department of Psychology emphasize the integration of applied research with faculty, practical experience in professional settings, and traditional classroom activities. The programs are characterized by faculty mentorship, individual advising, and group activities with faculty, graduate students, and other undergraduate students.

The B.S. in Psychology offers a distinctive research-based, human-behavior-oriented undergraduate education with an emphasis on applications of psychology. Students benefit from the strengths of faculty in the highly successful graduate programs in clinical psychology, industrial/organizational psychology, and rehabilitation and mental health counseling.

Interdisciplinary degrees provide career-focused training that spans academic departments. These degrees combine coursework and hands-on experience in the multiple fields, including psychology, political science, sociology, communication, and business. Interdisciplinary training prepares students to succeed in the modern workplace, which increasingly relies on cross-functional teams with diverse expertise. 

The B.S. in Behavioral Health and Wellness provides students with a broad understanding of how lifestyle choices impact health, and how health professionals design programs to promote healthy lifestyle choices. The degree prepares graduates for a wide range of health/wellness professions in private business and industry, community organizations, and healthcare environments.

The B.S. in Consumer Research, Analytics, and Communication trains students as integrated social/behavioral scientists who can apply the theory, research, and tools of the social and behavioral sciences to practical problems of government policy and business strategy and can work with decision makers in both cultures.

The Department of Psychology also offers accelerated programs that combine undergraduate and graduate professional education. The degrees offered by the department may be used as the basis for the combined undergraduate-graduate professional degree programs in law (B.S./J.D.), business (B.S./M.B.A.), public administration (B.S./M.P.A.), rehabilitation and mental health counseling (B.S./M.S.), or personnel and human resources development (B.S./M.S.) offered by the university.

Scholarship Opportunities

Psychology students have access to a wide range of scholarships. One program—the David J. Vitale Scholarship—is earmarked only for undergraduate psychology students.

Recipients typically receive $2,000–$5,000 per year. This award is only applicable to a student’s first four years of study at the university.

Degree Programs

Minors

Minors consist of at least five courses (minimum 15 credit hours) and are optional and frequently cross-disciplinary. Since they provide a coherent set of ideas, concepts, and educational experiences in a variety of areas, students may find that they enhance potential for professional development. Students who wish to pursue a minor must consult with advisers in their respective major departments.

The Department of Psychology offers minors in Human Resources, Psychology, and Rehabilitation Services. Students pursuing a degree in psychology can minor in Rehabilitation Services.

Human Resources

A minimum of 15 credit hours is required for this minor.

PSYC 221Introduction to Psychological Science3
PSYC 301Industrial Psychology3
PSYC 310Social Psychology3
Select a minimum of two courses from the following:6
Occupational Health Psychology3
Psychological Testing3
Development and Evaluation of Training in Organizations3
Groups and Leadership at Work3
Total Credit Hours15

Psychology

A minimum of 15 credit hours is required for this minor, including the following two required courses:

PSYC 203Undergraduate Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences3-4
or PSYC 320 Applied Correlation and Regression
PSYC 221Introduction to Psychological Science3

Rehabilitation Services

A minimum of 15 credit hours is required for this minor.

PSYC 410Introduction to Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3
PSYC 411Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions3
PSYC 412Multicultural and Psychosocial Issues in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3
PSYC 583Rehabilitation Engineering Technology I: Survey of Interdisciplinary Application of RET3
PSYC 590Psychiatric Rehabilitation3
Total Credit Hours15

Optional Programs

Advanced Standing Programs

The Department of Psychology offers combined, accelerated undergraduate and graduate programs and graduate advanced standing programs. These flexible programs give students solid professional credentials in more than one field, improving their marketability and expanding their career options.

A specialization in psychology may be used as the basis for the combined undergraduate-graduate professional degree programs in law (B.S./J.D.), business (B.S./M.B.A.), public administration (B.S./M.P.A.), or personnel and human resources development (B.S./PHRD) offered by the university. Students earning a B.S. in Psychology degree can apply for advanced standing in the M.S. in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling program.

For undergraduate psychology majors, it is possible to earn a Master of Science in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling with Advanced Standing or a Master of Science in Personnel and Human Resources Department (PHRD) in one-and a-half years instead of the normal two years. By taking psychology courses that apply to the rehabilitation and mental health counseling or PHRD program, graduate program coursework can be reduced by up to 15 credit hours, or one full-time semester.

Students wishing to participate in these options must indicate this as early as possible. With the consent of the Department of Psychology chair, undergraduate psychology students may enroll in some graduate-level psychology courses. Close communication with advisers is required for students to reach their target completion dates for accelerated programs. Students must also meet the minimum graduate program admission criteria, apply, and be accepted into the graduate program they wish to enter.

M.S. Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling with Advanced Standing

The mission of the Counseling and Rehabilitation Sciences Division is to prepare students to assume vital roles as counselors fully qualified to help in the clinical mental health, rehabilitation, vocational, educational, and personal adjustment of people with disabilities, chronic illnesses, and/or mental and emotional issues.

The rehabilitation and mental health counseling education program, fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education since 1975, and dually accredited for Clinical Mental Health and Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), is designed to prepare students to function as rehabilitation and/or clinical mental health counselors for persons with a variety of needs including mental health issues impacting the individual and/or family, and persons with physical or mental disabilities who need psychosocial and vocational readjustment. The program is grounded in a strengths-based philosophy of client empowerment where the counselor’s role is to assist individuals to realize their optimum level of mental health and personal wellness, including vocational adjustment and independent living. This is done through the use of a variety of therapeutic interventions, including individual, group and/or family counseling, diagnosis, case management, the provision or coordination of evaluation, physical restoration, training, placement, and follow-up services. The demand for rehabilitation and clinical mental health counselors has exceeded the supply in recent years, in public, private, nonprofit, and for-profit sectors.

Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling Courses

Undergraduate students who complete the equivalent of the first semester’s required courses may qualify for admission with advanced standing to the Master of Science in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling. Admission with advanced standing may reduce the courses required for the M.S. degree by up to 15 credit hours, and allow the candidate to complete the Master of Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling degree in one-and-a-half years (three semesters). The regular master’s program in rehabilitation and mental health counseling requires 60 credit hours post bachelor’s degree usually completed over the course of two years. However, undergraduate students who meet the criteria for regular admission to the master’s program can consider completing their master’s degree more quickly by effective use of their electives. In the junior and senior years, qualified students begin taking graduate courses after admission into the program.

Students in the accelerated program may take the following courses as part of required or elective courses for the B.S. in Psychology. If taken as an undergraduate student, the courses listed below do not have to be repeated for the Master of Science in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling. A grade of "B" or better is required for courses to be used toward a graduate degree.

PSYC 410Introduction to Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3
PSYC 411Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions3
PSYC 412Multicultural and Psychosocial Issues in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3
PSYC 513Assessment in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3
PSYC 523Introduction to Theories of Psychotherapy3
PSYC 562Job Placement3
PSYC 563Human Growth and Career Development3
PSYC 583Rehabilitation Engineering Technology I: Survey of Interdisciplinary Application of RET3
PSYC 590Psychiatric Rehabilitation3

B.S./M.S. Personnel and Human Resources Development

The M.S. in Personnel and Human Resources Development degree is for individuals interested in careers in highly dynamic environments such as management consulting, human resources management, industrial relations, and consumer behavior.

Housed within the Industrial/Organizational Psychology Division, the personnel and human resources development program is based on a scientist/practitioner model and the guidelines of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Division 14, of the American Psychology Association.

Personnel and Human Resources Development Courses

Students in the accelerated program may choose to take five of the following courses as part of required or elective courses for the B.S. in Psychology. If taken as an undergraduate student, the courses listed below do not have to be repeated for the graduate personnel and human resources development program. A grade of "B" or better is required for courses to be used toward a graduate degree.

PSYC 502Social Bases of Behavior3
PSYC 503Learning and Cognition3
PSYC 504Individual and Cultural Differences3
PSYC 529Personnel Selection and Evaluation3
PSYC 545Graduate Statistics I3
PSYC 546Graduate Statistics II3
PSYC 556Organizational Psychology3

Illinois Institute of Technology/College of DuPage Dual Admission 2+2 Program

Students who meet the requirements of the Dual Admission Program (DAP) may enroll simultaneously at the College of DuPage (COD) and Illinois Institute of Technology. Students accepted into the DAP will have access to advising and other services from both institutions. Students who successfully complete the institutional course requirements of both institutions under the DAP will be awarded an associate’s degree from COD and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree from IIT.

Eligibility for the Program

Students applying to the program must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 either in high school or at COD to be eligible for admission to the DAP. Students must make satisfactory academic progress at COD, as defined by COD and IIT, to remain in the program.

Application Process

Applicants must complete a Statement of Intent Form which permits the exchange of academic, admission, and advising information between IIT and COD. Applicants must also complete the application process at both COD and IIT in order to be admitted to both institutions. The IIT application may be submitted only for a B.S. in Psychology degree. Admission to other IIT programs may have additional requirements that are outside the scope of this program.

Academic Program Requirements

Students must follow each institution’s policies regarding admission, course enrollment, transfer hours, probation, dismissal, and reinstatement. Transcripts must be sent to the IIT Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs each semester for each student attending COD and enrolled in the DAP. IIT will provide COD with major and course updates, course prerequisites, and program requirements for the psychology program.

Graduation Requirements

Students enrolled in the DAP must follow the COD catalog to satisfy requirements for the associate’s degree and the requirements set out in the IIT Undergraduate Bulletin in effect at the time of admission into the DAP for the bachelor’s degree.

Certificate in Industrial Training

This certificate is designed to help individuals learn methods of knowledge delivery in industrial training settings and is only available to students enrolled in a degree program at Illinois Institute of Technology. This certificate program does not qualify for federal financial aid.

Program of Study

The American Society of Training and Development has a certificate with topics and courses similar to this certificate program. We ensure that our students will receive training on par with ASTD specifications. An introductory psychology course or basic knowledge of the field is recommended for this program.

PSYC 301Industrial Psychology3
PSYC 423Learning Theory3
PSYC 455Development and Evaluation of Training in Organizations3
Select one of the following: 13
Human Motivation and Emotion3
Topics in Psychology 23
Topics in Psychology 23
Psychological Testing3
Cognitive Science3
Groups and Leadership at Work3
Undergraduate Psychology Seminar3
1

These courses cannot be counted toward the certificate if they are a required course for a degree program.

2

Topic must be approved by the adviser.

Course Descriptions

PSYC 100
Introduction to the Profession

Students will: 1) introduce an overview of concepts in psychology; 2) develop professional direction for academic career at IIT; 3) demonstrate psychology information literacy; 4) demonstrate effective communication using a variety of formats; and 5) demonstrate professional competence both within and outside of IIT.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PSYC 203
Undergraduate Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

The objectives of this course are to develop skills in using statistical data analysis commonly used in the behavioral sciences (e.g. descriptive statistics, ANOVA, regression, correlation, and meta-analysis). At the end of the course students should be able to comprehend statistical research findings, run basic statistical analysis, as well as make inferences from the results.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 1 Credits: 4
PSYC 204
Research Methods in Behavioral Science

Introduction to experimental, survey, and field study methodology, including: ethics; research design; collection, preparation, analysis of data; and writing research reports.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 203)]AND[(PSYC 221) OR (PSYC 222)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 1 Credits: 4
Satisfies: Communications (C), Natural Science (N)
PSYC 221
Introduction to Psychological Science

Psychologists use the scientific method to understand the behavior and mental processes of individuals. Their investigations into understanding the behavior of individuals span multiple areas including perception, learning, cognition, language, development, motivation, personality, psychological disorders, social, health, and industrial/organization. In addition to the variety of fields, psychology examines behavior at multiple levels such as biological, behavioral, and cultural. This course will: 1) introduce the field of psychological science; 2) explore the research methods psychologists use to answer questions; 3) use research and theory to introduce psychological processes in multiple fields; and 4) to apply psychological theories to mass media.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 238
Professional Skills

Didactic and applied approach to professional skill development in the areas of oral communication, conflict management and interpersonal dimensions of the work setting.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 250
Introduction to Leadership: Concepts and Practices

A survey of historical and contemporary theories, concepts and complexities associated with leadership. Emphasis will be placed on application of theories to practical experiences of leadership.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 301
Industrial Psychology

Survey of practical applications of psychology to problems of business and industry: work attitudes and behavior; employee selection; morale; safety; turnover; absenteeism; and training.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 303
Abnormal Psychology

Overview of various cognitive, emotional, and behavioral disorders, focusing on diagnostic criteria, causal factors, and treatment, and emphasizing scientific, research-oriented perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): [(PS 190-298) OR (PSYC 190-299) OR (SOC 190-299)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 310
Social Psychology

Description and analysis of behavior and experience as determined by social conditions. Includes social issues, human relations, prejudice, and leadership.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 312
Human Motivation and Emotion

This course will provide a broad overview of major theories of human motivation, both historical and contemporary. After learning about these theories, students will explore how researchers have applied these principles in health care, sports, management, education, and virtual/gaming environments.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 320
Applied Correlation and Regression

This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to apply correlation and regression analysis to the study of human behavior. Emphasis will be placed on practical issues associated with these statistical techniques and significant attention will be paid to running analyses and reporting results.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 203)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 330
Health Psychology

Health psychology applies psychological principles to health promotion and the prevention and treatment of illness. The goal of this course is to provide a thorough understanding of the key concepts and theories important to health psychologists and the skills to think analytically and critically about health issues. The course will cover a broad range of topics including stress, coping, and behaviors that promote health and prevent illness. The course will also cover specific health problems such as HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, eating disorders, and substance abuse and critically examine the underlying biological, psychological, and social factors influencing the onset, course, and outcomes of these diseases.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PSYC 350
Prejudice and Stigma

People differ in the identities they hold across dimensions like race, religion, gender, sexuality, age, ability and socioeconomic status. These identities can be stigmatized within the larger group and have profound effects on people. In this course, we will consider the function and costs of prejudice and stigma for members of both stigmatized and majority (nonstigmatized) groups as well as review research aimed at reducing prejudice and stigma. This course aims to give students the skills necessary to critically understand contemporary instances of prejudice and stigmatization from a social psychological perspective. Another course objective is for students to draw parallels across stigma and prejudice processes while also understanding nuances for each group. A final objective is to give students the opportunity to reflect on personally held beliefs about diverse groups.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 352
Personality Theory

This course will provide an overview of prominent approaches to personality psychology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 355
Cross-Cultural Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize you with a wide range of topics in cross-cultural psychology. The ability to understand the influence of culture is essential for success in an increasingly diverse and global society. This course will expose you to a variety of topics such as cross-cultural communication, diversity in the workplace, personality and national traits and happiness across cultures. The aim is to provide a framework for appreciating the cultural context of psychological phenomenon in order to facilitate better navigation of diverse societies and workplaces.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 360
Clinical Psychology: Assessment and Treatment

This course will provide an overview of psychological testing and assessment and psychotherapy and professional activities of clinical psychologists. This course will provide an in-depth examination of the concepts and methods of clinical psychology, document the many activities of clinical psychologists, and highlight the trends in the filed that are likely to shape the field in upcoming years. Students will gain an increased understanding of the psychological services and information about clinical psychology as a future career goal.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 303)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 363
Introduction to Sports Psychology

In this course, students will explore the major psychological theories related to sport and exercise behavior. The course is designed to introduce students to the field of sport and exercise psychology through a combination of classroom discussion and exercise application. This course will provide students with a broad overview of major topics including: the history of sports and exercise psychology; foundations of personality, self-concept, self-esteem, motivation, and other psychological characteristics related to participation and performance in sports; coaching and leadership in sports; gender and cultural issues; team dynamics; performance enhancement strategies; and sports as recreation.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 370
Occupational Health Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize you with a wide range of topics in occupational health psychology (OHP). Understanding the relationship between work and health is vital in the face of increasingly demanding and complex work. This course will expose you to topics that examine how work affects our health and vice versa. These include work organizational factors (organizational justice, dark workplace behaviors such as incivility, shift-work, work-family interface) and their impact on employee health and well-being (stress, emotions, job-burnout, recovery experiences).

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 380
Topics in Psychology

An investigation into a topic of current interest in psychology. The specific topic will be announced by the instructor when the course is scheduled.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 381
Topics in Psychology

An investigation into a topic of current interest in psychology. The specific topic will be announced by the instructor when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221) OR (PSYC 301) OR (PSYC 303) OR (PSYC 310)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 406
History and Systems of Psychology

Historical development of influential psychological systems: structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, and Gestalt psychology. Requires 12 hours of psychology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 409
Psychological Testing

This course is designed to introduce you to psychological testing and assessment. After completing this course, you will be familiar with the test development process, testing techniques, and different types of tests. Further, you will learn about the use of tests in educational, organizational, and clinical/counseling settings. In this course, you will learn the underlying principles of psychological testing and measurement including test construction and scale development.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 203) OR (PSYC 221) OR (PSYC 301)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 410
Introduction to Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

Historical, philosophical, ethical, and legal bases of rehabilitation and mental health counseling. Includes a study of professional roles, functions, and responsibilities as well as service delivery systems and practices such as vocational, independent living, and public and private rehabilitation and mental health counseling.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 411
Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions

Survey of human organ systems, medical terminology, unique characteristics of disabling conditions, including severe disabilities. Vocational consequences, environmental impact and implications for the rehabilitation process. One of a two course sequence.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221) OR (PSYC 222)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
PSYC 412
Multicultural and Psychosocial Issues in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

Review of diversity issues in rehabilitation and mental health counseling including culture, disability, gender, aging, socio-economic status, and spirituality and religion. Includes theories of multicultural counseling and the counselor's role in the promotion of self-awareness and social justice; a study of individual and family adaptation and coping processes following disability; psychological and sociological consequences of disability; attitudes toward persons with disabilities; and the impact of social and environmental barriers.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221 and PSYC 222)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 414
Neural and Biological Bases of Behavior

An introduction to the biological bases of behavior with an emphasis on neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of sensory and central nervous systems.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
PSYC 423
Learning Theory

Learning plays an important role in psychology and the general processes and mechanisms that underscore learning are utilized in a number of fields including neuroscience, clinical science, education, and cognitive science. We will examine several theoretical perspectives on learning including, but not limited to, functionalistic, associationistic, cognitive, social, and neurophysiological. We will also examine how factors such as motivation, artificial intelligence, technology, disability, and intelligence play a role in learning.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 426
Cognitive Science

The goal of this course is to understand how the mind works. Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary field that draws on experimental psychology, computer science, linguistics, animal behavior, neuroscience, and behavioral economics, among others.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 222)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 435
Child Development

Developmental psychologists examine behavioral and biological changes as they occur over the entire lifespan. Their investigations into mechanisms of developmental change span biological, behavioral, and cultural levels of organization. Students will be able (1) to identify the major milestones of development in various domains (e.g. perceptual, motor, cognitive, social) and (2) use research and theory to understand the mechanisms by which developmental change occurs.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 436
Adult Development

Explores processes and changes in cognitive, social, physical and emotional functioning across adult life. Requires 9 hours of psychology.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221 and PSYC 303) OR (PSYC 301) OR (PSYC 310)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 449
Practicum in Rehabilitation Services

Seminar and supervised fieldwork experience in a rehabilitation setting with disabled individuals. Emphasizes service delivery, interviewing techniques, and caseload management.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 410, PSYC 411, PSYC 412*, and SOC 480)]An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 455
Development and Evaluation of Training in Organizations

The goal of this course is to provide the learner with a systems perspective to training in organizations. Through readings, discussions, in class exercises and project work students will learn to identify organizational issues that can be solved using a training intervention and develop appropriate training. The focus of the course will primarily be on knowledge application. Students will learn about the various steps involved in designing a training program including needs assessment, influence of learner characteristics, transfer of training and training evaluation. Through project work students will gain skills in implementing these steps.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221) OR (PSYC 301)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 456
Engineering Psychology

Theory of human physical and psychological abilities as they relate to design of transportation, housing, workplace, defense and recreational systems. Topics include theories relating to psychophysiology, anthropometry, communications, man-machine interactions, training, maintainability, safety, and engineering evaluation.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 460
Child and Adolescent Disorders

This course focuses on the major disorders that are evident in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. A developmental psychopathology approach will be used in which major influences on both normal and abnormal child development will be examined. Students will be exposed to the contextual and socioemotional factors that impact children's development, followed by an in-depth discussion of the various disorders.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 303)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 465
Behavior Change Principles and Practice

Students will learn about theories of behavior and apply scientific principles used to promote behavior change. Major topics will include stages of change, motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral techniques, and contingency management (reward and punishment). Emphasis will be given to altering pathological behaviors and to promoting healthy lifestyle changes in the context of one on one or small group settings.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 303)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 481
Groups and Leadership at Work

The course will review a system's model of groups and will discuss developmental stages of groups as they relate to communication behaviors. It will also review various approaches to leadership including individual, contingency, and relationship. The course engages students in various activities to help them become aware of themselves as team members and team leaders.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 221 and PSYC 301)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 482
Undergraduate Research Seminar I

An introduction to applied research in psychology. Includes a didactic review of basic and current issues in psychological research as well as an experiential component. Students actively participate in ongoing faculty research programs and are exposed to all areas of research.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 204 and PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
PSYC 483
Undergraduate Research Seminar II

An introduction to applied research in psychology. Includes a didactic review of basic and current issues in psychological research as well as an experiential component. Students actively participate in ongoing faculty research programs and are exposed to all areas of research.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 204, PSYC 221, and PSYC 222)]
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
PSYC 485
Senior Capstone Project I

The Psychology Capstone Project is an independent study that consists of a formal project and may include a research component, a literature review component as well as a data analysis component or may include an internship or fellowship experience as discussed by you and your project advisor. The project should incorporate and expand upon the depth of knowledge gained from previous years of study and include predetermined deliverables which may include a final thesis or poster. The project should focus on an area of psychology that is of interest to you as a means to expand your knowledge on the subject and to solidify your future goals.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 486
Senior Capstone Project II

Continuation of the Psychology Capstone Project. This is an independent study that consists of a formal project and may include a research component, a literature review component as well as a data analysis component or may include an internship or fellowship experience as discussed by you and your project advisor. The project should incorporate and expand upon the depth of knowledge gained from previous years of study and include predetermined deliverables which may include a final thesis or poster. The project should focus on an area of psychology that is of interest to you as a means to expand your knowledge on the subject and to solidify your future goals.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 487
Integrative Psychology Seminar I

A synthesis of issues and areas in psychology. Requires 21 credit hours in psychology.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 203)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 488
Integrative Psychology Seminar II

Seminar integrating seminal and cutting edge psychological writings both empirical and conceptual to address key issues in contemporary psychology. Requires 24 credits in psychology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 489
Undergraduate Psychology Seminar

Reports and discussion of current problems and issues in psychology.

Prerequisite(s): [(PSYC 204 and PSYC 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 497
Special Problems

Independent study involving compilation and analysis of data bearing on a significant problem. **Instructor permission required.**

Credit: Variable
PSYC 498
Advanced Research

Advanced research for BSMP students.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 3