Physics (PHYS)

PHYS 100
Intro to the Profession

Introduction to the physical sciences, scientific method, computing tools, and interrelations of physical sciences with chemistry, biology and other professions.

Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Credits: 2
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 120
Astronomy

A descriptive survey of observational astronomy, the solar system, stellar evolution, pulsars, black holes, galaxies, quasars, the origin and fate of the universe.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 123
General Physics I: Mechanics

Vectors and motion in one, two and three dimensions. Newton's Laws. Particle dynamics, work and energy. Conservation laws and collisions. Rotational kinematics and dynamics, angular momentum and equilibrium of rigid bodies. Gravitation. Oscillations.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 149*) OR (MATH 151*)]An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3 Lab: 3 Credits: 4
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 200
Introduction to Energy, Waves, Materials, and Forces

This course will address the basic physical principles and concepts associated with energy, power, heat, light, sound, circuits, materials, fluids, and forces. Although quantitative at times, the course will stress conceptual understanding and practical applications.

Lecture: 4 Lab: 0 Credits: 4
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
PHYS 211
Basic Physics I

Intended to give students in liberal arts, business, and psychology an understanding of the basic principles of physics and an appreciation of how the results of physics influence contemporary society. This course does not satisfy graduation in any engineering or physical science program.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 122) OR (MATH 148) OR (MATH 151)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 212
Basic Physics II

Intended to give students in the liberal arts, business, and psychology an understanding of the basic principles of physics and an appreciation of how the results of physics influence contemporary society. This course does not count for graduation in any engineering or physical science program.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 122) OR (MATH 148) OR (MATH 151)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 221
General Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism

Waves charge, electric field, Gauss' Law and potential. Capacitance, resistance, simple a/c and d/c circuits. Magnetic fields, Ampere's Law, Faraday's Law, induction, and Maxwell's equations. Traveling waves, electromagnetic waves, and light.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 149) OR (MATH 151)]AND[(MATH 152*)]An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3 Lab: 3 Credits: 4
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 223
General Physics III

Sound, fluid mechanics and elasticity. Temperature, first and second laws of thermodynamics, kinetic theory and entropy. Reflection, refraction, interference and diffraction. Special relativity. Quantization of light, charge and energy.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 3 Credits: 4
PHYS 224
General Physics III for Engineers

Sound and fluid mechanics. Temperature, first and second laws of thermodynamics, kinetic theory and entropy. Reflection, refraction, interference and diffraction. Special relativity. Light and quantum physics, structure of the hydrogen atom. Atomic physics, electrical conduction in solids, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 152, PHYS 123, and PHYS 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 240
Computational Science

This course provides an overview of introductory general physics in a computer laboratory setting. Euler-Newton method for solving differential equations, the trapezoidal rule for numerical quadrature and simple applications of random number generators. Computational projects include the study of periodic and chaotic motion, the motion of falling bodies and projectiles with air resistance, conservation of energy in mechanical and electrical systems, satellite motion, using random numbers to simulate radioactivity, the Monte Carlo method, and classical physical models for the hydrogen molecule and the helium atom.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 221)]
Lecture: 2 Lab: 3 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 300
Instrumentation Laboratory

Basic electronic skills for scientific research. Electrical measurements, basic circuit analysis, diode and transistor circuits. Transistor and integrated amplifiers, filters, and power circuits. Basics of digital circuits, including Boolean algebra and design of logic circuits.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 221)]
Lecture: 2 Lab: 4 Credits: 4
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 301
Mathematical Methods of Physics

Real and complex numbers and their properties. Vectors, matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices and quadratic forms, and applications. Fourier series, integrals, and transform. Basic probability. Orthogonal polynomials and special functions. Partial differential equations and separation of variables method. Calculus of complex variables.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 251, MATH 252, and PHYS 223)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 304
Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics

Statistical basis of thermodynamics, including kinetic theory, fundamentals of statistical mechanics, fluctuations and noise, transport phenomena and the Boltzmann equation. Thermodynamic functions and their applications, first and second laws of thermodynamics.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 223) OR (PHYS 224)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 308
Classical Mechanics I

Newton's Laws, one-dimensional motion, vector methods, kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, and the Kepler problem. Collisions, systems of particles, and rigid-body motion. Approximation techniques, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of classical mechanics, small oscillations.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 252)]AND[(PHYS 223) OR (PHYS 224)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 309
Classical Mechanics II

Newton's Laws, one dimensional motion, vector methods, kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, and the Kepler problem. Collisions, systems of particles, and rigid-body motion. Approximation technique, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of classical mechanics, small oscillations.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 252)]AND[(PHYS 223) OR (PHYS 224)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 348
Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers

An introduction to modern physics with the emphasis on the basic concepts that can be treated with elementary mathematics. Subjects covered include Bohr atom, elementary wave mechanics and an introduction to quantum mechanics, atom and molecular spectra, nuclear, and particle physics.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 223)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 360
Introduction to Astrophysics

This course provides an overview of astrophysics and introduces the student to the many conventions, units, coordinate systems, and nomenclature used in astrophysics. The course will survey observational, stellar, and extragalactic astrophysics as well as cosmology. The course will also include planetary astronomy including extrasolar planets.

Prerequisite(s): [(CHEM 122) OR (CHEM 124)]AND[(PHYS 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
PHYS 361
Observational Astrophysics

This course provides an overview of astrophysics and introduces the student to the many conventions, units, coordinate systems, and nomenclature used in astrophysics. The course will survey observational, stellar, and extragalactic astrophysics as well as cosmology. The course will also include planetary astronomy (including extrasolar planets).

Prerequisite(s): [(CHEM 122) OR (CHEM 124)]AND[(PHYS 221)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 1 Credits: 4
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
PHYS 403
Relativity

Introduction to the special and general theories of relativity. Lorentz covariance. Minkowski space. Maxwell's equations. Relativistic mechanics. General coordinate covariance, differential geometry, Riemann tensor, the gravitational field equations. Schwarzschild solution, astronomical and experimental tests, relativistic cosmological models.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 251 and PHYS 308)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 404
Subatomic Physics

Historical introduction; general survey of nuclear and elementary particle physics; symmetries and conservation laws; leptons, quarks, and vector bosons; unified electromagnetic and weak interactions; the parton model and quantum chromodynamics.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 348)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 405
Fundamentals of Quantum Theory I

A review of modern physics including topics such as blackbody radiation, the photoelectric effect, the Compton effect, the Bohr model of the hydrogen atom, the correspondence principle, and the DeBroglie hypothesis. Topics in one-dimensional quantum mechanics such as the particle in an infinite potential well, reflection and transmission from potential wells, barriers, and steps, the finite potential well and the quantum harmonic oscillator. General topics such as raising and lowering operators, Hermitian operators, commutator brackets and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle are also covered. Many particle systems and the Pauli Exclusion Principle are discussed. Three-dimensional quantum mechanical systems, orbital angular momentum, the hydrogen atom.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 252, PHYS 308*, and PHYS 348)]An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 406
Fundamentals of Quantum Theory II

Zeeman and Stark Effects. Addition of spin and orbital angular momenta, the matrix representation of quantum mechanical operators, the physics of spin precession and nuclear magnetic resonance. Time independent and time dependent perturbation theory, Fermi's Golden Rule and the physics of radiation emitted in the course of atomic transitions. Indistinguishable particles in quantum mechanics, the helium atom. Scattering theory, using partial wave analysis and the Born approximation.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 405)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 410
Molecular Biophysics

The course covers thermodynamic properties of biological molecules, irreversible and open systems, information theory, biophysical measurements, the structure and properties of proteins, enzyme action, the structure and properties of nucleic acids, genetics at the molecular level, and molecular aspects of important biological systems.

Prerequisite(s): [(CHEM 343) OR (PHYS 304)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 412
Modern Optics and Lasers

Geometrical and physical optics. Interference, diffraction, and polarization. Coherence and holography. Light emission and absorption. Principles of laser action, characterization of lasers, and laser applications.

Prerequisite(s): [(CS 105 and PHYS 348)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 413
Electromagnetism I

Differentiation and integration of vector fields, and electrostatics and magnetostatics. Calculation of capacitance, resistance, and inductance in various geometries.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 252 and PHYS 308)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 414
Electromagnetism II

Propagation and generation of electromagnetic radiation. Antennas and waveguides. Maxwell's equations. Electromagnetic properties of materials. Classical electrodynamics; special relativity.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 413)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 415
Solid State Electronics

Energy bands and carrier transport in semi-conductors and metals. Physical principles of p-n junction devices, bipolar junction transistors, FETS, Gunn diodes, IMPATT devices, light-emitting diodes, semiconductor lasers.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 348)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 418
Introduction to Lasers

Nature of light. Coherence and holography. Light emission and absorption. Principles of laser action. Characteristics of gas lasers, organic dye lasers, solid state lasers. Laser applications.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 348)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 420
Bio-Nanotechnology

In this multidisciplinary course, we will examine the basic science behind nanotechnology and how it has infused itself into areas of nanofabrication, biomaterials, and molecular medicine. This course will cover materials considered basic building blocks of nanodevices such as organic molecules, carbon nanotubes, and quantum dots. Top-down and bottom-up assembly processes such as thin film patterrning through advanced lithography methods, self-assembly of molecular structures, and biological systems will be discussed. Students will also learn how bionanotechnology applies to modern medicine, including diagnostics and imaging and nanoscale, as well as targeted, nanotherapy and finally nanosurgery.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 348)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 425
High Energy Astrophysics

High-energy astrophysics covers interactions in the most extreme physical conditions across the cosmos. Included in this course are the physics of black holes, neutron stars, large scale jets, accretion, shocks, and particle acceleration. Emission mechanisms resulting from relativistic particle acceleration are covered including synchrotron radiation and Bremsstrahlung and Compton processes. Recent observations of X-ray to TeV gamma-ray energies have contributed significantly to understanding these phenomena and will be highlighted.

Prerequisite(s): [(MATH 251, MATH 252, and PHYS 348)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 427
Advanced Physics Laboratory I

Experiments related to our present understanding of the physical world. Emphasis is on quantum phenomena in atomic, molecular, and condensed matter physics, along with the techniques of measurement and data analysis. The second semester stresses project-oriented experiments on modern topics including spectroscopy, condensed matter physics, and nuclear physics.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 348)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 428
Advanced Physics Laboratory II

Experiments related to our present understanding of the physical world. Emphasis is on quantum phenomena in atomic, molecular, and condensed matter physics, along with the techniques of measurement and data analysis. The second semester stresses project-oriented experiments on modern topics including spectroscopy, condensed matter physics and nuclear physics.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 348)]
Lecture: 2 Lab: 3 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 437
Solid State Physics

Crystal structure and binding, lattice vibrations, phonons, free electron model, band theory of electrons. Electrical, thermal, optical, and magnetic properties of solids. Superconductivity.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 348)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 440
Computational Physics

Root finding using the Newton-Raphson method; interpolation using Cubic Splines and Least Square Fitting; solving ordinary differential equations using Runge-Kutta and partial differential equations using Finite Difference and Finite Element techniques; numerical quadrature using Simpson's Rule, Gaussian Quadrature and the Monte Carlo method; and spectral analysis using Fast Fourier Transforms. These techniques are applied to a wide range of physics problems such as finding the energy levels of a finite quantum well using a root finding technique, solving the Schrodinger equation using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method, using random numbers to simulate stochastic processes such as a random walk, using the Fast Fourier Transform method to perform a spectral analysis on non-linear chaotic systems such as the Duffing oscillator, and using auto-correlation functions to simulate sonar or radar ranging problems.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 240, PHYS 308, PHYS 348, and PHYS 405)]
Lecture: 2 Lab: 3 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 460
Stellar Astrophysics

This course will cover the formation, structure, and evolution of stars. Stellar remnants (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes) will also be covered. Aspects of the interstellar medium relevant to star formation will be covered as well.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 360)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 461
Extragalactic Astrophysics

This course will cover galaxy morphology, dynamics, and structure. This course will also cover cosmology including dark matter, dark energy, and fate of the universe.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 360)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 465
Electrical, Magnetic, and Optical Properties

Electronic structure of solids, semiconductor devices, and their fabrication. Ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Magnetic properties, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, magnetic materials and devices. Optical properties and their applications, generation, and use of polarized light. Same as MMAE 465.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PHYS 485
Physics Colloquium

Lectures by prominent scientists. This course exposes students to current and active research in physics both within and outside the IIT community. It helps prepare students for a career in research. It is complementary to our academic courses and provides examples of professional/scientific presentations. This course may not be used to satisfy the natural science general education requirement.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 223) OR (PHYS 224)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 1
PHYS 491
Undergraduate Research

Recommendation of advisor and approval of the department chair. Student participation in undergraduate research, usually during the junior or senior year.

Credit: Variable
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 497
Special Topics in Physics

Special topics in physics.

Credit: Variable
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PHYS 498
Research Honors Thesis Preparation

Background and research following a summer research honors project, preparing to write a research honors thesis in Physics 499. Student will organize a review committee to direct and review the research.

Credit: Variable
PHYS 499
Research Honors Thesis

Background and laboratory research and thesis writing following a summer research project and thesis preparation. The student will meet regularly with his or her committee during thesis preparation and will write and defend thesis.

Credit: Variable