Architecture (ARCH)

ARCH 100
Introduction to Architecture

Orientation to contemporary local architecture practice in the context of the history of architectural theory; examination of the changing role of the architect through history; introduction to the formal language and vocabulary of the discipline. Emphasis given to developing written and presentations skills.

Lecture: 2 Lab: 3 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
ARCH 107
Design Communications I: Units and Order

A comparative study of physical and digital media from the immediacy of the hand to the logical rigor of algorithmic design. Organizational systems and mapping strategies are explored as craft is developed across a broad toolkit. Instruction in object-oriented thinking begins an introduction to computer science.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 108
Design Communications II: Systems and Assemblages

The full design communication process, from contextual + programmatic analysis to the digital fabrication of a system of parts, will be introduced through a series of related studies. Computationally associative design methodologies will be utilized and continue the computer science introduction.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 107)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 113
Architecture Studio I: Elements

Introduction of architecture through the design of architectonic elements -- walls, doors, stairs, rooms, etc. Students explore the relationship between the human body and the built environment and learn fundamentals of composition, design process, representation, research, craftsmanship, graphic and verbal communication, and analytical thinking.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
Satisfies: Communications (C)
ARCH 114
Architecture Studio II: Unit

As an extension of the themes of ARCH 113, students explore the synthesis of architectural elements in the design of an integrated architectonic unit comprised of architectural elements. Students are introduced to urban research and further develop their skills of analytical thinking, representation, and design communication.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 107, ARCH 108*, and ARCH 113)]An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
Satisfies: Communications (C)
ARCH 201
Architecture Studio III: House

Continued development of architectural principles of ARCH 114 through the design of a house in the city and the study of dwelling precedents. Students are introduced to the concepts of programming, urban design, and the technical aspects of construction assemblies and further develop their understanding of design process and their skills in design communication and critical thinking.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 113 and ARCH 114)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
ARCH 202
Architecture Studio IV: Multiple

Continued development of architectural principles of ARCH 201 through research and design of multi-unit housing in the city. Students further their understanding of programming, urban design and the technical aspects of construction assemblies. The study of architectural scale, composition and urban relationships are explored. Development of design process and skills of design communication and critical thinking are furthered.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 113, ARCH 114, and ARCH 201)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
ARCH 207
Design Communications III: Analysis and Exposure

Introduction to geospatial mapping, data modeling, and data visualization processes for research, analytics, and generative design. Basic data structures, algorithms, and design patterns advance students ability to construct digital tools and communicate complexity.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 107 and ARCH 108)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 208
Design Communications IV: Interaction and Immersion

Introduction to immersive, mixed media, and mixed reality experience design and physical interactivity for hybrid media practices for the built environment.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 107, ARCH 108, and ARCH 207)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 230
Systems: Structural Analysis

The course will provide the student with an understanding of basic structural behavior. It will teach students about forces, vectors, equilibrium, statics, free body diagrams, material properties, stress, strain and deformation. It will look at the concepts of loads takedown and tributary area. Part of that discussion will be the concept of diaphragms (flexible vs. rigid) as a way of distributing horizontal loads to the lateral resisting systems.

Prerequisite(s): [(PHYS 123) OR (PHYS 200) OR (PHYS 211 and PHYS 212)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
ARCH 305
Architecture Studio V: Hybrid

Continued development of architectural principles of ARCH 202 through research and design of a project of hybrid program in the city. Students further their understanding of programming, urban design and the technical aspects of construction assemblies. The study of architectural and urban space, site and context, building composition and urban relationships are explored. Development of design process and skills of design communication and critical thinking are furthered.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 201, ARCH 202, and ARCH 230)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
ARCH 306
Architecture Studio VI: Neighborhood

Continued development of architectural principles of ARCH 305 through the design of an urban neighborhood project. Students are introduced to urban design and larger scale planning issues and conduct broad-based research into issues impacting larger mixed-use buildings in the city.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 201, ARCH 202, ARCH 230, ARCH 305, and ARCH 334)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
ARCH 321
Contemporary Architecture

This course investigates the state of contemporary architecture as represented by significant practices, buildings, theories, and criticisms. Themes to be considered include globalization, the role of digital design media, the ethics and aesthetics of sustainability, contemporary urbanism, new approaches to materials and structure, and recent interests in ornament and pattern-making. Current conditions will be related historically to postwar reactions to modernism and contextually to the social and technological shifts of recent decades.

Prerequisite(s): [(AAH 119 and AAH 120)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
ARCH 331
Visual Training I

Aesthetic expression as experience. Exercises in the study of form: proportion and rhythm, texture and color, mass and space. Exercises in visual perception and aesthetic judgment. Isolation and analysis; interdependence and integration of sensuous qualities. Aesthetic unity under restrictive conditions.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 332
Visual Training II

Aesthetic expression as experience. Exercises in the study of form: proportion and rhythm, texture and color, mass and space. Exercises in visual perception and aesthetic judgment. Isolation and analysis; interdependence and integration of sensuous qualities. Aesthetic unity under restrictive conditions.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 331)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 333
Visual Training III

Spatial studies with planes and volumes of various materials. Aesthetic expression as experience. Exercises in the study of form: proportion and rhythm, texture and color, mass and space. Exercises in visual perception and aesthetic judgment. Isolation and analysis; interdependence and integration of sensuous qualities. Aesthetic unity under restrictive conditions.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 331 and ARCH 332)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 334
Material: Metal

A comprehensive investigation of steel building design viewed through material properties, structural members, and structural systems. The focus of the class will be the understanding and reduction of complex steel building concepts into understandable components of the detail, the element, and the system. Topics include flexural members, compression members, tension members, lateral and gravity systems, and connections. Current and historical precedents will be presented in case studies and building tours.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 230)]AND[(PHYS 123) OR (PHYS 200)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
ARCH 335
Material: Cementitious

A comprehensive investigation of concrete building design viewed through material properties, structural members, and structural systems. The focus of the class is the understanding and reduction of complex concrete building concepts into understandable components of the detail, the element and the system. Topics include flexural members, compression members, geotechnical engineering, foundation systems, lateral and gravity systems, connections, and detailed technical drawings. Current and historical precedents will be presented in case studies and building tours.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 230)]AND[(ARCH 334)]AND[(PHYS 123) OR (PHYS 200)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
ARCH 403
Mechanical and Electrical Building Systems for Architects I

Selection and design of building support systems: heating, ventilating, air conditioning, water supply, sanitary and storm drainage, power distribution, lighting, communications and vertical transportation. Systems are analyzed for their effect on building form, construction cost and operating efficiency.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 201 and ARCH 202)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 404
Mechanical and Electrical Building Systems for Architects II

Selection and design of building support systems: heating, ventilating, air conditioning, water supply, sanitary and storm drainage, power distribution, lighting, communications, and vertical transportation. Systems are analyzed for their effect on building form, construction cost and operating efficiency.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 403)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 413
Architectural Practice

Lectures and practical problems dealing with specifications, specification writing, administration of construction, contracts, building law and professional practice.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
ARCH 414
Professional Practice: Building Case Studies

Case study analysis of buildings, including the design process, building detailing, construction methods, government regulation, owner satisfaction, and post-construction forensics.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
ARCH 417
Architecture Studio VII: Institution

This course introduces students to technical aspects of building design through a Comprehensive Building Design project focusing on an institutional building in the city. Building on previous design studios, students continue their investigation into urban and cultural research, and are introduced to building systems and concepts of building performance, sustainability and building envelope design. The integration of mechanical, electrical, plumbing systems, structural systems, constructional assemblies, and technology systems is addressed in lectures and studio work, and students are introduced to advanced tools related to building performance and evaluation software.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 230, ARCH 306, ARCH 334, ARCH 335, ARCH 403, and ARCH 404)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
ARCH 418
Architecture Studio VIII: Institution

This course continues and furthers the student's understanding of the technical aspects of building design through a Comprehensive Building Design project focusing on an institutional building in the city with a complex program. Building on previous design studios, students continue their investigation into urban, programmatic and cultural research, and further their knowledge of building systems and concepts of building performance, sustainability and building envelope design. The integration of mechanical, electrical, plumbing systems, structural systems, constructional assemblies, and technology systems is addressed in lectures and studio work, and students further their understanding of advanced tools related to building performance and evaluation software.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 230, ARCH 334, ARCH 335, ARCH 403, ARCH 404, and ARCH 417)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
ARCH 419
Architecture Cloud Studio IX: Metropolis

The cloud studio is a research-based design studio focused on investigating the complex forces that shape the built environment and proposing new strategies for urban development. The aim of the studio is to build a commentary and transformative agenda toward the future metropolis and to drive urban and architectural design solutions with the most advanced technologies and critical thought. The studio production is oriented toward the development of new strategies and future urban models with the aim of advancing the knowledge of relationships between urban thinking and materiality, technology, energy, ecology, emerging media, and socio-political and cultural concerns. Strong emphasis is put toward engagement with external parties and agencies to connect the academic environment with the professional practice and to promote cross-disciplinary collaboration. Students will be able to select from a variety of studio topics. Vertical studio integrating advanced BArch, MArch, MLA, MS, and PHD students. Open only to Architecture majors.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
ARCH 420
Architecture Cloud Studio X: Metropolis

The design-based research studio is a continuation of the ARCH 419 research-based design studio. It is focused on the development of the specific proposals based on the critical findings of ARCH 419. The aim of the studio is to develop formal solutions which address the complexities of modern metropolis and advance disciplinary knowledge at large. The studio production is oriented toward the development of projects in a variety of scales from large-scale master plans, urban designs, and landscape designs to new urban typologies and singular buildings, all of which can address a variety of the issues pertinent to the modern metropolis. The studios are formed in few thematic clusters which complement each other or serve as dialectical opposites. Each studio explores variety of techniques from the parametric design, digital fabrication, model making, and advanced geospatial software to cultural and theoretical discourses. Vertical studio integrating advanced BArch, MArch, MLA, MS, and PHD students. Students will be able to select from a variety of studio topics. Open only to Architecture majors.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 6
ARCH 421
Basics of Building Simulation in the Built Environment I

The application of energy conservation methods and renewable energy sources, such as wind power and passive solar systems, will be examined in the development of building energy budgets for a variety of building types.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 422
Energy Conscious Design II

The application of energy conservation methods and renewable energy sources, such as wind power and passive solar systems, will be examined in the development of building energy budgets for a variety of building types.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 421)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 423
Architectural Programming

Study of the principles of problem definition, problem solving, and decision making in the process of design. Specific research methods are reviewed, including those with computer-aided data collection potential. Coursework includes: identification of client/project requirements and constraints; development of a building/project program; cost analysis; development of relevant design options; and presentation skills and development.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
ARCH 429
Digital Form Generation

Introduction to the development of algorithmic design methods, a basis for computational thinking. Review programming in CAD systems, programming basics in AutoCAD, extensive creation of 2D and 3D architectural forms, wall patterns, CAD data interrogation, manipulation, and extraction. Introduction to 2D and 3D parametric and rule-based design. Investigation of form creation based on a variety of mathematical relationships including random generation and form generation based on collected data values including images. Also included is a review of CAD database procedures for space planning and bill of quantities. Includes methods for creating models for the purpose of fabrication including CNC and rapid prototyping.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 125, ARCH 226, and ARCH 427) OR (ARCH 428)]
Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
ARCH 431
Visual Training I

This elective comprises several topics. They include traditional media, e.g. sculpture, collage or free-hand drawing, digital prototyping, exhibition design, digital media production, architectural lighting, interior design, etc. The course provides students the opportunity to pursue individual paths in order to synthesize skills acquired in the previous visual training segments of the curriculum.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 506 with min. grade of C and ARCH 507 with min. grade of C)]
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
ARCH 432
Visual Training II

This elective comprises several topics. They include traditional media, e.g. sculpture, collage or free-hand drawing, digital prototyping, exhibition design, digital media production, architectural lighting, interior design, etc. The course provides students the opportunity to pursue individual paths in order to synthesize skills acquired in the previous visual training segments of the curriculum.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 506 with min. grade of C and ARCH 507 with min. grade of C)]
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
ARCH 433
Introduction to Digital Fabrication

This course offers a comprehensive exploration of computer-aided fabrication from concept development and modeling through digital file creation and cutting processes. Using CAD/CAM software, laser cutters, CNC mills, and 3D printers, students with a variety of interests can build the elements of detailed models, fabricate a range of finished objects, or even create landscapes incorporating highly articulated surfaces. The course stresses the integration of the complete thought process from concept development to pre-visualization to detailed modeling to fabrication setup and finishing. Students gain a solid understanding of the rapidly developing world of CAD/CAM techniques while acquiring specific long-term skills in software-based modeling and machine-assisted fabrication.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 208) OR (ARCH 508)]
Lecture: 1 Lab: 1 Credits: 3
ARCH 434
Advanced Building Information Modeling Strategies

This course is an in-depth exploration of how building information modeling tools are being utilized in the architectural profession with an emphasis on Autodesk Revit. Advanced BIM modeling tools and strategies will be investigated alongside explorations into interoperability between tools.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 208) OR (ARCH 508)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 3 Credits: 3
ARCH 435
Digital Fabrication

This course explores the design and fabrication of components in contemporary practice. The class will investigate through the design and prototyping of a custom component. Survey of CAD/CAM/GIS use in practice and component manufacturing including modeling, simulation, and scripting. Behavioral models of components using simulation and analysis tools (flow, system dynamics, etc.). Use of CAD tools to model components for production (modeling for CNC considering toolpaths and jigs). Use of CAD tools to analyze properties of components. Material properties and related fabrication constraints. Current fabrication processes. Use of IIT-owned CNC tools to fabricate components. Rapid prototyping.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 433)]
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
ARCH 436
Advanced Modeling

This course will focus on 3D modeling of complex geometric components in architecture and design. Concepts explored will concentrate on the advancement of digital design as an iterative process. Various modeling types covered are (1) Explicit Modeling, (2) Nurbs Surface Modeling, (3) Parametric Modeling, and (4) Generative Components and Response Modeling. Output will utilize digital fabrication methods as support of the iterative design process.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 208) OR (ARCH 508)]
Lecture: 0 Lab: 3 Credits: 3
ARCH 438
Design Visualization

This course is an in-depth exploration of new visualization techniques to support and express architectural design through 3D rendering. Topics covered will include 3D modeling, cameras, lighting, material mapping, and rendering output. Presentation concepts covered include storytelling, rendering style, visual mood, and image composition.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 208) OR (ARCH 508)]
Lecture: 1 Lab: 3 Credits: 3
ARCH 440
Pure Form

The concept of pure form resides in the abstract in their ideal state the forms are perfect. Material properties inherently defy perfection and force a set of priorities and decisions that render the proximity of an ideal while providing a sensual experience. The study of the relationship between ideas, form and physical making integral to the production process, through repetition and variation. Production of a cohesive body of investigative work of a single pure form.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 441
Collage Making

Collage, the act of bringing together disparate materials and imagery, has the opportunity to explore unknowns, exploit the peculiar, and reveal the uncanny. Collage operates within a contemporary context of mass-production, mass media, and mass consumption. Mash ups, cut ups, power mixing, and sampling are artistic methods of repurposing products made by others. Collage Making explores the iterative process of collection/selection/arrangement and execution. Collages produced will examine architecture in contemporary culture.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 107) OR (ARCH 506)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 445
The Prairie School

Prairie School landscape architects and architects investigated the spatial and material properties of the Midwest which influenced many aspects of design in the twentieth century: ecology, successional and dynamic processes, horizontality, and others. The course specifically addresses the work of Jens Jensen, O.C. Simonds, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Alfred Caldwell within the context of the contemporary discourse on landscape architecture and architecture.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 446
History of Landscape Architecture

Survey of the history of landscape design throughout the world, including contemporary projects. The course emphasizes both analytical and holistic approaches to the study of historic designs, highlights the relationship between architecture and landscape, and stresses major concepts that directly influence present day designs. One field trip.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 447
Architecture and Furniture

Individually or in small groups, students will design and fabricate furniture as part of a collectively developed master plan. Students explore historic and contemporary furniture design, theory, materials, and fabrication techniques. Lectures and discussions will focus on the relationship between architecture and furniture in its 500-year history, the design process, fabrication technologies and techniques, drawing and modeling as a means of exploration, representation, presentation, and fabrication. Labs will allow students the opportunity to experience in a semester the traditional sequence of master plan, schematic design, design development, construction drawings, fabrication, and use.

Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
ARCH 454
Contemporary Chicago Architecture: Case Studies

Contemporary architecture and urban design projects in Chicago present an invaluable opportunity to learn about some of the most advanced applications in practice today. By examining significant projects currently underway, this course will investigate project execution, design concepts and the various forces affecting projects' definition and results. Close scrutiny of all the components and personnel will give a better understanding of the complex synergies, advanced technologies, and adept project teams necessary for successful innovative architecture and urban planning.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 456
Topics in Modernism

This class is devoted to the close observation, description, and analysis of works of architecture from 1900 to the present. We will read exemplary texts of architectural criticism and history. Conducted as a seminar, this course studies writings and buildings through research papers, presentations, and other projects.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
ARCH 460
Integrated Building Delivery Practice/BIM

Architecture has always been a complex interdisciplinary business, where the management of allied professions and industry affiliates is critical to the success of any endeavor of significant scale. The introduction of BIM (Building Information Modeling) is an advance in project delivery tools which should be viewed as a multi-dimensional expansion of the mechanisms of management and accommodation of an ever-broadening range of participants in the organization of a project, allowing the development of a new delivery protocol, IBPD (Integrated Building Project Delivery). BIM is currently recognized as consolidating the basis for a range of functions including drawing, modeling, document management, clash detection, interdisciplinary coordination, estimating, scheduling, constructability review, production modularization, fabrication protocols, and for the analysis of myriad physical and proscriptive demands such as energy consumption, daylighting, code compliance, egress, circulation, and operation scenarios. The breadth of information embedded in a BIM model will require the emergence of facilitating professionals to an extent previously unknown in the practice and the industry. This course explores the state of the profession and the anticipated ramifications. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 461
Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Architecture

The course teaches future architects the practical aspects of entrepreneurial small business management, to develop a comprehensive opportunity assessment, and to develop the skills necessary to improve the odds of success. The course will consider strategies to leverage limited resources for maximum effect. The course will also cover small organization and group behavior, performance, leadership, and motivation in small business settings and will focus on the owner/manager as the principal success factor in the context of a small organization. Emphasis is placed on the circumstances and opportunities of the professional practice of architecture: practice as profession, process, organization, business, and evolving models of practice are covered. The course also provides a series of concepts, frameworks, and heuristics that enable the entrepreneur to anticipate and deal with the challenges that accompany growth of an existing business. Cases, exercises, lectures, and speakers are used to focus on choosing opportunities, allocating resources, motivating employees, and maintaining control while not stifling innovation. A key component of the course is how to sustain entrepreneurial thinking in mid-sized ventures as they continue to grow. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 462
Planning Law and Land Policy

Since the introduction of basic zoning laws to the numbers and complexity of ordinances attached to any land parcel have proliferated to include those addressing land use, development, density, environmental concerns both on and off site, aesthetic mandates, energy use, quality of life concerns, and infrastructure development, the growing understanding that comprehensive and integrated systems must be managed across property lines to effect sustainable planning and communities will accelerate the number of prescriptive and policy ordinances enforced at the development of a parcel. Many agencies have further created extra-legal linkages between approvals for land development and the provision of social and ideological benefits to the community. The impact on the profession of architecture of the panoply of planning options and governmental goals is the result that the navigation of the system of mandated design determinates is one of the initial and potentially most creative acts in the process of project delivery. Project designers must understand the ramifications and trade-offs inherent in the system, especially in any attempt to achieve the best use of any parcel of land and position the most appropriate built environment. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 463
Introduction to Real Estate Finance Fundamentals

The Art of the Deal, with the emphasis on Art, is a term best positioning the financial structuring behind any project. The ability of the project team leader in integrated practice to understand and appreciate the motivations and opportunities inherent in the initiation of the project will be essential in guiding team decisions and maintaining a leadership position. The understanding of the financial underpinnings of a project is of paramount importance to those intending to actually engage the process of initiating and effecting a construction activity. The sources, costs, and sequence of funding, budgeting, cash flow, incentives options, and tax ramifications regarding a project are to be addressed as component knowledge to an understanding of integrated project management. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 465
Construction and Project Management

The organization of deliverables from the multiple participants in a project plan, including estimating, quality control, value engineering, scheduling of work, conflict resolution, pay schedules, and project close-out and commissioning are essential to managing a building project. Many of these areas of endeavor are those most directly impacted by the developments addressed in Integrated Building Delivery Practice. This course will solidify the underpinnings and will amplify, where needed, the requisite understanding in these areas of the practice. The development of managerial skills requisite to the practice of this coordination and the basis of developing inter-professional relationships will be stressed throughout the incorporation of the technical methodologies.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 466
Entrepreneurial Design: Sector Studies/Case Studies

This course will be advanced as an independent study format. Each student will work independently to research a project option, or building type, and document the particular attributes of that case study which require specialized address. Case studies might be a particular business niche such as land sub-divisions, condo conversions, change of use conversions, or build-to-suit options. The studies might pursue particular building types, social initiatives, historic restoration strategies, or even unique construction typologies. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 467
Advanced Materials Workshop

This course is designed to involve students with the architectural craft of materials that can be applied to model and prototype construction. Included will be a product project of the student's own choosing.

Lecture: 1 Lab: 4 Credits: 3
ARCH 468
Drawing From Travel

A drawing course that develops the perceptual and technical skills critical to drawing in the field. Particular emphasis will be placed on the freehand travel sketch and its capacity to evoke both the physicality and character of a place. Production of a comprehensive drawn record of travels in the form of a journal/sketchbook is required. Various media will be explored.

Requisite: European Study Program or Paris Program
Lecture: 0 Lab: 6 Credits: 3
ARCH 469
Urban Design in Europe

This seminar course will explore current notions of urbanity as observed in the built environment of some cities in Europe. Projects and discussions will complement the design work undertaken in the architecture design studio. Assignments will focus on documentation and analysis of the various daily patterns and rituals of habitation.

Requisite: European Study Program or Paris Program
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 470
Image City: Mediation of Space

This seminar surveys the interaction between media and the city from the 19th century to the present. Any consideration of contemporary urban issues must take into account the roles that media and information technologies play in our lives. Every space we encounter or create has to be considered mediated. Course work will include assigned readings, assigned screenings, and creative design problems related to the issues considered in class.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 471
Architectural Freehand Rendering

Utilizing site visits, lectures, presentations, and critiques, students will learn freehand sketching, perspective, and conceptual sketching to convey building spatial ideas. Conceptual and schematic analysis of site visits will teach students to represent existing spaces, environments, and buildings as well as various building materials. Students will rely on four media to quicken their drawing skills and visual analysis -- pencil, ink, pastel, and water color.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 473
Conflict and Time

This seminar employs comparative studies of other arts, in particular cinema, to illuminate architectural aesthetics and the creative process. It has a dual focus: it undertakes an introduction to film studies through the analysis of films and readings in film theory and aesthetics; at the same time, it will consider architectural concepts and artifacts. The aim is not primarily to study cinema nor to make a definitive conclusion about the congruence or divergence of architecture and cinema. The course intends to cultivate a way of seeing: to illuminate the relations between media, technology, geography, architecture, and ideology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 475
Spatial Stories

This course will examine the spatial story as it appears in diverse media: short fiction, films, everyday discourse, architecture, etc. The coursework will consist of reading and writing assignments as well as the viewing of films and other visual artifacts. The course has two goals: to offer students the opportunity to improve their study and communication skills and to examine the social, cultural, and historical aspects of spatial practices such as architecture.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
ARCH 476
Developed Surface

This course looks at models as operational and instrumental tools that assist an architect to control both the material and the meaningful. Acting as an advanced seminar and workshop, course sessions will juxtapose speculative model making with seminar discussion. Student work will be reviewed in direct relation to readings and short lectures on historical and theoretical precedents in art, architecture, and urban design. Field research will support speculative mapping and modeling systems. A project to support the studio will reconcile a conceptual interest with a technical one. (Paris Program)

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 478
Digital Photography

Equips students with a suite of photographic skills and strategies tailored to their work as architects. Cultivates a discursive practice by developing foundational technical competencies, building awareness of key precedents, and honing a critical perspective for reading photographic images. Topics covered include camera operation, composing, staging, lighting, post-processing, printing, editing, curating, and publishing. Field and studio assignments, case study research work, and conversations with practicing photographers.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 480
Materials and Construction

This course provides an overview of basic building materials and assemblies, how they are constructed, and the relationships between them. The objective is to introduce students to the range of material choices available to the designer, new materials and assemblies, and fundamental principles to guide design decisions. The course is organized according to the MasterFormat outline developed by the Construction Specifications Institute. Students will learn standards for writing specifications using a system of numbered categories to organize construction activities, products, and requirements into a standard order. Topics include pre-design issues, sites and foundations, concrete, masonry, metals, wood, plastics, thermal and moisture protection, glass, roofing systems, and conveying equipment.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 481
Materiality in Architecture

This course examines the topic of material culture in contemporary architecture, and explores the different approaches, ideas and philosophies associated with aspects of materiality in architecture through the investigation and discussion of case study projects by contemporary architects. Students are introduced to a variety of approaches to the topic since the dawn of the Modern Movement, and explore how different contemporary architects approach the idea of materiality in their work, through their words, thoughts and built work. Thematic topics related to materiality are also presented and discussed, including materiality and landscape, materiality and technology, and materiality and memory. The class format is a lecture presentation by the professor with student discussion. The course is an elective section of the History/Theory sequence.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 482
Material: Fibrous

A laboratory and experimental-based class investigation of anisotropic fibrous materials as a building component viewed through historical timber design precedents. Topics include low and high-rise framed construction, cross-laminated timber, CNC fabrication methods composite construction, tensile systems, and wood and paper-based products. Structural analysis will explore material properties and connections of a directionally grained and fibrous medium.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 230, ARCH 334, and ARCH 335) OR (ARCH 485 and ARCH 486)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 483
Material: Transparent

An exploration of historical and current technology through the work of artists, architects, craftsmen, and engineers in a brittle medium. Topics include wall systems, connections, structural design of all glass structures, and material properties. Sealants, coatings, adhesives, and impact and blast resistant interlayers will also be covered. A lab component will encourage experimentation of columns, beams, and surfaces from glass components.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 230, ARCH 334, and ARCH 335) OR (ARCH 485 and ARCH 486)]
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
ARCH 485
Structures I: Structural Analysis -- The System

Basic understanding of the system involves forces, vectors, equilibrium, statics, supports with free body diagrams, material properties, stress, strain, and deformation (force or temperature). Simple structural systems will be analyzed using simple statics and free body diagrams. The latter part of the course will concentrate on structural typologies. Load paths will be analyzed for several different types, construction materials, and structural systems. Principles of deflection will be presented along with vertical and lateral displacement issues.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 486
Structures II: Building Design

A comprehensive investigation of building design viewed through the mechanics of elemental forces. The focus of the class will be the understanding and reduction of complex building concepts into understandable components of the detail, the element, and the system. Topics include lateral resisting components, diaphragms, moment frames, shear walls, and braced frames in historical and current precedents.

Prerequisite(s): [(ARCH 485)]
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 487
Eco Structures

Research seminar giving focus to new technologies, especially complex structures: biotechnic, pneumatic, ultra-tall, composite structures, etc. Students conduct research using literature, data sources, and ideas to prepare imaginative small project interdisciplinary approach to solving problems in the built environment.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 488
Long-Span and Special Structures

Introduction of structural systems for long spans and special structures. The structural behavior will be discussed and the required strength and stiffness will be evaluated. Individual projects will be assigned to students to be presented at the end of the course.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 489
Structural Systems for Tall Buildings and Long-Span Structures

This course reviews the historical development of the interaction of the structure with architecture and explores future trends and directions. The suitability of different materials and systems will be studied, with emphasis placed on efficiency.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 491
Special Problems

Independent study of projects and problems. Students must be advised and have consent of the instructor and approval of the dean.

Credit: Variable
ARCH 495
Technology as Design

Since the development of cast iron as a viable construction material in the mid-1800s, one path of architecture has explored the open-ended possibilities of technology. Integrated within the culture, this determination to use the technology of one's time as the creative generator of a new evolving architecture becomes the historical precedent of the thesis of this course.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
ARCH 497
Special Projects

Independent study of projects and problems. Students must be advised and have consent of the instructor and approval of the dean.

Credit: Variable
ARCH 498
Academic Training and Research Special Project

Architecture related academic training opportunities (research projects or internships) for students.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 0 Credits: 3