Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 100
Introduction to the Profession

Students will: 1) introduce an overview of concepts in psychology; 2) develop professional direction for academic career at IIT; 3) demonstrate psychology information literacy; 4) demonstrate effective communication using a variety of formats; and 5) demonstrate professional competence both within and outside of IIT.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PSYC 203
Undergraduate Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

The objectives of this course are to develop skills in using statistical data analysis commonly used in the behavioral sciences (e.g. descriptive statistics, ANOVA, regression, correlation, and meta-analysis). At the end of the course students should be able to comprehend statistical research findings, run basic statistical analysis, as well as make inferences from the results.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 1 Credits: 4
PSYC 204
Research Methods in Behavioral Science

Introduction to experimental, survey, and field study methodology, including: ethics; research design; collection, preparation, analysis of data; and writing research reports.

Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 221 or PSYC 222) and PSYC 203
Lecture: 3 Lab: 1 Credits: 4
Satisfies: Communications (C), Natural Science (N)
PSYC 221
Introduction to Psychological Science

Psychologists use the scientific method to understand the behavior and mental processes of individuals. Their investigations into understanding the behavior of individuals span multiple areas including perception, learning, cognition, language, development, motivation, personality, psychological disorders, social, health, and industrial/organization. In addition to the variety of fields, psychology examines behavior at multiple levels such as biological, behavioral, and cultural. This course will: 1) introduce the field of psychological science; 2) explore the research methods psychologists use to answer questions; 3) use research and theory to introduce psychological processes in multiple fields; and 4) to apply psychological theories to mass media.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 238
Professional Skills

Didactic and applied approach to professional skill development in the areas of oral communication, conflict management and interpersonal dimensions of the work setting.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 250
Introduction to Leadership: Concepts and Practices

A survey of historical and contemporary theories, concepts and complexities associated with leadership. Emphasis will be placed on application of theories to practical experiences of leadership.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 301
Industrial Psychology

Survey of practical applications of psychology to problems of business and industry: work attitudes and behavior; employee selection; morale; safety; turnover; absenteeism; and training.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 303
Abnormal Psychology

Overview of various cognitive, emotional, and behavioral disorders, focusing on diagnostic criteria, causal factors, and treatment, and emphasizing scientific, research-oriented perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 190-299 or SOC 190-299 or PS 190-298
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 310
Social Psychology

Description and analysis of behavior and experience as determined by social conditions. Includes social issues, human relations, prejudice, and leadership.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 312
Human Motivation and Emotion

This course will provide a broad overview of major theories of human motivation, both historical and contemporary. After learning about these theories, students will explore how researchers have applied these principles in health care, sports, management, education, and virtual/gaming environments.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 320
Applied Correlation and Regression

This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to apply correlation and regression analysis to the study of human behavior. Emphasis will be placed on practical issues associated with these statistical techniques and significant attention will be paid to running analyses and reporting results.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 330
Health Psychology

Health psychology applies psychological principles to health promotion and the prevention and treatment of illness. The goal of this course is to provide a thorough understanding of the key concepts and theories important to health psychologists and the skills to think analytically and critically about health issues. The course will cover a broad range of topics including stress, coping, and behaviors that promote health and prevent illness. The course will also cover specific health problems such as HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, eating disorders, and substance abuse and critically examine the underlying biological, psychological, and social factors influencing the onset, course, and outcomes of these diseases.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C)
PSYC 350
Prejudice and Stigma

People differ in the identities they hold across dimensions like race, religion, gender, sexuality, age, ability and socioeconomic status. These identities can be stigmatized within the larger group and have profound effects on people. In this course, we will consider the function and costs of prejudice and stigma for members of both stigmatized and majority (nonstigmatized) groups as well as review research aimed at reducing prejudice and stigma. This course aims to give students the skills necessary to critically understand contemporary instances of prejudice and stigmatization from a social psychological perspective. Another course objective is for students to draw parallels across stigma and prejudice processes while also understanding nuances for each group. A final objective is to give students the opportunity to reflect on personally held beliefs about diverse groups.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 352
Personality Theory

This course will provide an overview of prominent approaches to personality psychology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 355
Cross-Cultural Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize you with a wide range of topics in cross-cultural psychology. The ability to understand the influence of culture is essential for success in an increasingly diverse and global society. This course will expose you to a variety of topics such as cross-cultural communication, diversity in the workplace, personality and national traits and happiness across cultures. The aim is to provide a framework for appreciating the cultural context of psychological phenomenon in order to facilitate better navigation of diverse societies and workplaces.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 360
Clinical Psychology: Assessment and Treatment

This course will provide an overview of psychological testing and assessment and psychotherapy and professional activities of clinical psychologists. This course will provide an in-depth examination of the concepts and methods of clinical psychology, document the many activities of clinical psychologists, and highlight the trends in the filed that are likely to shape the field in upcoming years. Students will gain an increased understanding of the psychological services and information about clinical psychology as a future career goal.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 303*, An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 363
Introduction to Sports Psychology

In this course, students will explore the major psychological theories related to sport and exercise behavior. The course is designed to introduce students to the field of sport and exercise psychology through a combination of classroom discussion and exercise application. This course will provide students with a broad overview of major topics including: the history of sports and exercise psychology; foundations of personality, self-concept, self-esteem, motivation, and other psychological characteristics related to participation and performance in sports; coaching and leadership in sports; gender and cultural issues; team dynamics; performance enhancement strategies; and sports as recreation.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 370
Occupational Health Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize you with a wide range of topics in occupational health psychology (OHP). Understanding the relationship between work and health is vital in the face of increasingly demanding and complex work. This course will expose you to topics that examine how work affects our health and vice versa. These include work organizational factors (organizational justice, dark workplace behaviors such as incivility, shift-work, work-family interface) and their impact on employee health and well-being (stress, emotions, job-burnout, recovery experiences).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 380
Topics in Psychology

An investigation into a topic of current interest in psychology. The specific topic will be announced by the instructor when the course is scheduled.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 381
Topics in Psychology

An investigation into a topic of current interest in psychology. The specific topic will be announced by the instructor when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 or PSYC 301 or PSYC 303 or PSYC 310
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 409
Psychological Testing

This course is designed to introduce you to psychological testing and assessment. After completing this course, you will be familiar with the test development process, testing techniques, and different types of tests. Further, you will learn about the use of tests in educational, organizational, and clinical/counseling settings. In this course, you will learn the underlying principles of psychological testing and measurement including test construction and scale development.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203 or PSYC 221 or PSYC 301
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 410
Introduction to Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

Historical, philosophical, ethical, and legal bases of rehabilitation and mental health counseling. Includes a study of professional roles, functions, and responsibilities as well as service delivery systems and practices such as vocational, independent living, and public and private rehabilitation and mental health counseling.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 411
Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions

Survey of human organ systems, medical terminology, unique characteristics of disabling conditions, including severe disabilities. Vocational consequences, environmental impact and implications for the rehabilitation process. One of a two course sequence.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 or PSYC 222
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
PSYC 412
Multicultural and Psychosocial Issues in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

Review of diversity issues in rehabilitation and mental health counseling including culture, disability, gender, aging, socio-economic status, and spirituality and religion. Includes theories of multicultural counseling and the counselor's role in the promotion of self-awareness and social justice; a study of individual and family adaptation and coping processes following disability; psychological and sociological consequences of disability; attitudes toward persons with disabilities; and the impact of social and environmental barriers.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 222
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 414
Neural and Biological Bases of Behavior

An introduction to the biological bases of behavior with an emphasis on neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of sensory and central nervous systems.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Natural Science (N)
PSYC 423
Learning Theory

Learning plays an important role in psychology and the general processes and mechanisms that underscore learning are utilized in a number of fields including neuroscience, clinical science, education, and cognitive science. We will examine several theoretical perspectives on learning including, but not limited to, functionalistic, associationistic, cognitive, social, and neurophysiological. We will also examine how factors such as motivation, artificial intelligence, technology, disability, and intelligence play a role in learning.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 426
Cognitive Science

The goal of this course is to understand how the mind works. Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary field that draws on experimental psychology, computer science, linguistics, animal behavior, neuroscience, and behavioral economics, among others.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 222
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 435
Child Development

Developmental psychologists examine behavioral and biological changes as they occur over the entire lifespan. Their investigations into mechanisms of developmental change span biological, behavioral, and cultural levels of organization. Students will be able (1) to identify the major milestones of development in various domains (e.g. perceptual, motor, cognitive, social) and (2) use research and theory to understand the mechanisms by which developmental change occurs.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 436
Adult Development

Explores processes and changes in cognitive, social, physical and emotional functioning across adult life. Requires 9 hours of psychology.

Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 221 and PSYC 303) or PSYC 301 or PSYC 310
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 449
Practicum in Rehabilitation Services

Seminar and supervised fieldwork experience in a rehabilitation setting with disabled individuals. Emphasizes service delivery, interviewing techniques, and caseload management.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 480 and PSYC 412* and PSYC 411 and PSYC 410, An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 455
Development and Evaluation of Training in Organizations

The goal of this course is to provide the learner with a systems perspective to training in organizations. Through readings, discussions, in class exercises and project work students will learn to identify organizational issues that can be solved using a training intervention and develop appropriate training. The focus of the course will primarily be on knowledge application. Students will learn about the various steps involved in designing a training program including needs assessment, influence of learner characteristics, transfer of training and training evaluation. Through project work students will gain skills in implementing these steps.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 or PSYC 301
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 456
Engineering Psychology

Theory of human physical and psychological abilities as they relate to design of transportation, housing, workplace, defense and recreational systems. Topics include theories relating to psychophysiology, anthropometry, communications, man-machine interactions, training, maintainability, safety, and engineering evaluation.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 460
Child and Adolescent Disorders

This course focuses on the major disorders that are evident in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. A developmental psychopathology approach will be used in which major influences on both normal and abnormal child development will be examined. Students will be exposed to the contextual and socioemotional factors that impact children's development, followed by an in-depth discussion of the various disorders.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 303
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 465
Behavior Change Principles and Practice

Students will learn about theories of behavior and apply scientific principles used to promote behavior change. Major topics will include stages of change, motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral techniques, and contingency management (reward and punishment). Emphasis will be given to altering pathological behaviors and to promoting healthy lifestyle changes in the context of one on one or small group settings.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 303
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Communications (C), Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 481
Groups and Leadership at Work

The course will review a system's model of groups and will discuss developmental stages of groups as they relate to communication behaviors. It will also review various approaches to leadership including individual, contingency, and relationship. The course engages students in various activities to help them become aware of themselves as team members and team leaders.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 301
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 482
Undergraduate Research Seminar I

An introduction to applied research in psychology. Includes a didactic review of basic and current issues in psychological research as well as an experiential component. Students actively participate in ongoing faculty research programs and are exposed to all areas of research.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 204
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
PSYC 483
Undergraduate Research Seminar II

An introduction to applied research in psychology. Includes a didactic review of basic and current issues in psychological research as well as an experiential component. Students actively participate in ongoing faculty research programs and are exposed to all areas of research.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 222 and PSYC 204
Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Credits: 3
PSYC 485
Senior Capstone Project I

The Psychology Capstone Project is an independent study that consists of a formal project and may include a research component, a literature review component as well as a data analysis component or may include an internship or fellowship experience as discussed by you and your project advisor. The project should incorporate and expand upon the depth of knowledge gained from previous years of study and include predetermined deliverables which may include a final thesis or poster. The project should focus on an area of psychology that is of interest to you as a means to expand your knowledge on the subject and to solidify your future goals.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 486
Senior Capstone Project II

Continuation of the Psychology Capstone Project. This is an independent study that consists of a formal project and may include a research component, a literature review component as well as a data analysis component or may include an internship or fellowship experience as discussed by you and your project advisor. The project should incorporate and expand upon the depth of knowledge gained from previous years of study and include predetermined deliverables which may include a final thesis or poster. The project should focus on an area of psychology that is of interest to you as a means to expand your knowledge on the subject and to solidify your future goals.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 487
Integrative Psychology Seminar I

A synthesis of issues and areas in psychology. Requires 21 credit hours in psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 488
Integrative Psychology Seminar II

Seminar integrating seminal and cutting edge psychological writings both empirical and conceptual to address key issues in contemporary psychology. Requires 24 credits in psychology.

Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
PSYC 489
Undergraduate Psychology Seminar

Reports and discussion of current problems and issues in psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221 and PSYC 204
Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Credits: 3
Satisfies: Social Sciences (S)
PSYC 497
Special Problems

Independent study involving compilation and analysis of data bearing on a significant problem. **Instructor permission required.**

Credit: Variable
PSYC 498
Advanced Research

Advanced research for BSMP students.

Lecture: 0 Lab: 6 Credits: 3